Jun 272016
 

rendasAuthor: Tito Rendas

Abstract: In the context of national proceedings opposing the Dutch Association of Public Libraries and the collective management organization Stichting Leenrecht, the District Court of The Hague referred a question about the interpretation of articles 1(1), 2(1)(b), and 6(1) of the Rental and Lending Rights Directive (Directive 2006/115). The fundamental question currently pending before the CJEU is whether the Directive’s notion of “lending” should be interpreted as including e-lending services. Continue reading »

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Jun 252016
 

communia[Anna Mazgal, Communia Association, Link (CC-0)] The education exception benefits teachers, students, and researchers who need access to all types of educational and informational resources that are often protected by copyright. This exception balances the right to education with the rights of authors. Maintaining the balance is never easy, and some issues still await their interpretation in Estonia. Still, Estonia enjoys the widest education exception provisions among all EU member states. Within the Best Case Scenarios for Copyright series, we present Estonia as one of the best examples for education. Below you can find the basic facts and for more evidence check the Best Case Scenario for Copyright – Education in Estonia legal study. EU, it’s time to #fixcopyright! Continue reading »

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Jun 242016
 

michael-geist[Reposted from michaelgeist.ca, Link (CC-BY)] In recent weeks, there has been some media coverage claiming that Canadian educational materials are disappearing in the face of copyright fair dealing rules. For example, several weeks ago, Globe and Mail writer Kate Taylor wrote a column on copyright featuring the incendiary headline that “Kids Will Suffer if Canada’s Copyright Legislation Doesn’t Change.” This week, the CBC provided coverage of a writer’s conference panel with a piece titled “Copyright-free material edging out Canadian texts” that speaks of sales falling off a cliff. Continue reading »

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Jun 152016
 

communia[Anna Mazgal, Communia Association, Link (CC-0)]  The parody exception cultivates the French tradition of satire. When the goal is to make people laugh, anybody can freely create a distinctively different mockery of a protected work. This encourages creativity and freedom of expression.

Within the Best Case Scenarios for Copyright series, we present France as the best example for parody. Below you can find the basic facts and for more evidence check the Best Case Scenario for Copyright – Parody in France legal study. EU, it’s time to #fixcopyright! Continue reading »

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Jun 062016
 

australia flagCopyright Advisory Group to the COAG Education Council

Executive summary: Australia’s copyright laws operate as a serious roadblock to preparing children to be the creators and innovators of the future.

Government policy and community expectations require schools to take an increasing role in STEM education, industry collaboration, and equipping students with the digital skills they need to be successful in the workforce of the future. However, Australia’s copyright laws – designed in the age of classroom-based “chalk and talk” teaching – are simply not appropriate for today’s world of flipped classrooms, digital learning, and collaboration. Laws designed for photocopiers are ill-equipped to cope with interactive whiteboards, tablets and robotics. Continue reading »

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Jun 012016
 

Filippov and HofheinzSergey Filippov and Paul Hofheinz
Excerpt from Text and Data Mining for Research and Innovation 
Lisbon Council (CC-BY-NC-SA), Click here for the full paper

On 09 December 2015, the European Commission proposed a mandatory exception for research in EU copyright legislation for “public interest research organisations to carry out text and data mining of content they have lawful access to, with full legal certainty, for scientific research purposes.” Continue reading »

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May 312016
 
Image: tehgaverer (CC-BY-NC-SA)

Image: tehgaverer (CC-BY-NC-SA)

[IP Watch, Link (CC-BY-NC-SA)] The German Constitutional Court today ruled in favour of the “freedom to sample” – or freedom to remix – in a case between the singer/songwriter Sabrina Setlur and the band Kraftwerk.

The latter had filed complaints against the sampling of two seconds of rhythm from its 1977 song “Metall auf Metall” in Setlur’s 1997 “Nur mir”. The Federal High Court and several lower courts ruled in favour of Kraftwerk, pointing to German copyright legislation underlining the difference between re-using snippets from the original recording medium to re-performing them. Continue reading »

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Mar 212016
 

llama[Reposted from Technollama.co.uk, Link (CC-BY_NC-SA)] How much do you need to reproduce a video or broadcast in order to infringe copyright? In the age of Vine, Periscope and animated gifs, this question has become more important than ever. We now may have a partial answer in the case of England And Wales Cricket Board Ltd v Tixdaq Ltd.

The claimants in the case are Sky and the E&W Cricket Board (EWCB), which own the copyright in most live cricket broadcasts. The defendants operate the website Fanatix, which offers sport news, video and commentary. Fanatix’s users uploaded a considerable amount of 8 second cricket clips to the Fanatix companion app, and these were also available in other social media operated by the defendants. The claimants argue that these clips infringe their copyright, while the defendants argued that these fall under fair dealing for reporting and news coverage. Interestingly, the defendants also used an intermediary liability defence, arguing that they were simply mere conduits and hosting content uploaded by third parties. Continue reading »

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Mar 162016
 

michael-geist[Reposted from michaelgeist.ca, Link (CC-BY)] The role of copyright within the Canadian education system has emerged as a contentious issue in recent years as the Internet and digital technologies have transformed how schools provide students with access to materials. At the centre of the fight are a series of Supreme Court of Canada rulings that establish the boundaries of “fair dealing”,  which permits copying of reasonable portions of materials without the need for permission or further compensation.

My weekly technology law column (Toronto Star version, homepage version) notes that last month, the Copyright Board of Canada issued a landmark decision on copying practices in primary and secondary schools, largely affirming the approach adopted by educational institutions. As a result, Access Copyright, the copyright collective that represents publishers and authors, will collect far less for in-school copying than it originally demanded. Continue reading »

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Jan 222016
 

butler150px(Cross posted from ipclinic.org, Link] In October 2015 the Librarian of Congress issued an important new rule permitting faculty and staff creating MOOCs (massive open online courses) to copy short clips from video media protected by digital locks. The rule was the result of a petition brought by clinic students Mark Patrick and Sarah O’Connor on behalf of Peter Decherney, Professor of Cinema Studies and English at the University of Pennsylvania, the College Art Association (CAA), the International Communication Association (ICA), and the Society for Cinema and Media Studies (SCMS). The rule may be the first official acknowledgment that MOOC courses are appropriate venues for the fair use of copyrighted media, including video content. Continue reading »

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Jan 122016
 

communia[Timothy Vollmer, Communia, Link (CC-0)] Communia has published a policy paper on the topic of leveraging copyright in support of education. We contend that exceptions and limitations to copyright for education should support broad access and re-use of copyrighted content of all types in a variety of education settings and across borders. The best way to achieve the proper balance of interests at stake is through the adoption of an exception or limitation to copyright for educational purposes that meets the following requirements: Continue reading »

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Jan 072016
 

American_University_Washington_College_of_Law_LogoPIJIP Professors Carroll, Jaszi, and Flynn have submitted comments to the Nigerian Copyright Commission, which has posted a Draft Copyright Bill (2015) for public review. The release is part of its Project on the Reform of the Nigerian Copyright System, started in 2012 to “the promotion of a knowledge based and innovation driven economy for Nigeria and enhance the interests of Nigeria’s core cultural industries” and bring the country into compliance with trade obligations (among other objectives). Continue reading »

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