Nov 282016
 

cc2[Creative Commons blog, Link (CC-BY)] Below is an update from Creative Commons Indonesia, who recently worked with their national copyright office on proposed changes to law that will secure the ability of creators to use CC and other open licenses there.

In late 2014, Indonesia amended its copyright law to add several new provisions, including changes having to do with database rights, addressing copyright as an object in a collateral agreement, and making license recordation mandatory. The latter is something that could potentially be an issue with regard to the operation of Creative Commons licenses, as well as other open license in Indonesia. Continue reading »

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‘Reclaim Invention’ for the Benefit of Everyone

 Posted by on August 30, 2016  Comments Off on ‘Reclaim Invention’ for the Benefit of Everyone
Aug 302016
 

reclaim invention[Timothy Vollmer, Creative Commons, Link (CC-BY)] The vision of the Creative Commons project is universal access to research and education, and full participation in culture to drive a new era of development, growth, and productivity. Collaboration, sharing, and co-operation are in our nature — building community, co-operating towards common goods, and creating shared benefits are at the heart of who we are. But we know there’s a lot of failed sharing too, including missed opportunities, openwashing, and legal loopholes that permit individuals to take advantage of those who wish to share.

Today the Electronic Frontier Foundation is launching Reclaim Invention, a project that calls for reforms to the sharing of technologies developed within universities. The first step in the project is to get universities to stop selling inventions to patent trolls. Continue reading »

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House Democrats Press USTR to Clarify Position on Compulsory Licensing for Generic Medicines in Colombia

 Posted by on May 26, 2016  Comments Off on House Democrats Press USTR to Clarify Position on Compulsory Licensing for Generic Medicines in Colombia
May 262016
 

capitol building - USG photo[House Ways and Means Committee Democrats, Link] A group of 15 House Democrats today sent a letter to U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Michael Froman urging the Administration to clarify its position on compulsory licensing for generic medicines in Colombia.

The letter was led by Ways and Means Committee Ranking Member Sander Levin (D-MI), and also signed by Reps. Jim McGovern (D-MA), Jim McDermott (D-WA), Jan Schakowsky (D-IL), Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX), Peter Welch (D-VT), Rosa DeLauro (D-CT), John Lewis (D-GA), Barbara Lee (D-CA), Chris Van Hollen (D-MD), Peter DeFazio (D-OR), Lloyd Doggett (D-TX), David E. Price (D-NC), Carolyn B. Maloney (D-NY), and Sam Farr (D-CA). Continue reading »

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Civil Society Letter to President of Colombia, re: The Right to Issue a Compulsory License for the Cancer Medicine Imatinib

 Posted by on May 17, 2016  Comments Off on Civil Society Letter to President of Colombia, re: The Right to Issue a Compulsory License for the Cancer Medicine Imatinib
May 172016
 

colombia flag - better cropping[Joint Letter Signed by 122 Experts – PDF in English and Spanish, with Signatures] Dear President Santos:  We are lawyers, academics and other experts specializing in fields including intellectual property, trade and health, writing to affirm that international law and policy support Colombia´s right to issue compulsory licenses on patents in order to promote public interests including access to affordable medicines. Continue reading »

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Colombian Civil Society Letter to the Chair of the 2016 CEWG, Describing Imatinib Compulsory License Efforts and Pushback

 Posted by on May 3, 2016  Comments Off on Colombian Civil Society Letter to the Chair of the 2016 CEWG, Describing Imatinib Compulsory License Efforts and Pushback
May 032016
 

colombia flag - better croppingPresented by the Colombian civil society organizations: Ifarma Foundation, Misión Salud and CIMUN

Dear Mr. Bhanu Pratap Sharma, Chairman.

We would like to transmit to you and all assistants our best wishes for the success of this session, where governments, intergovernmental bodies and non-state actors are trying to get one step closer on mechanisms that will address the well known inefficiencies of the R&D model based on monopoly prices, inefficiencies that have caused innumerable harmful effects on people’s health and well-being.

But we need to put under your consideration, and the consideration of delegates and assistants, a special situation we are currently facing that reflects both the urgency and the interests that are preventing nations from reaching a global solution promptly. Continue reading »

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U.S. Department of Labor Adopts CC-BY Licensing Policy Department-Wide

 Posted by on February 1, 2016  Comments Off on U.S. Department of Labor Adopts CC-BY Licensing Policy Department-Wide
Feb 012016
 

cc-logo[Cable Green, Link (CC-BY)] Creative Commons (CC) believes publicly funded education, research and data resources should be shared in the global commons. The public should have access to what it paid for, and should not be required to pay twice (or more) to access, use, and remix publicly funded resources.

This is why we are pleased to announce that the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has adopted a department-wide Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license requirement on intellectual property developed under a competitive Federal award process. Continue reading »

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51 U.S. Congress Members Urge Reasonable Licensing Terms For Government-Funded Medical Patents

 Posted by on January 12, 2016  Comments Off on 51 U.S. Congress Members Urge Reasonable Licensing Terms For Government-Funded Medical Patents
Jan 122016
 
Photo by C.E. Kent (CC-BY)

C.E. Kent (CC-BY)

Jahan ‘Harry’ Taubman-Rezakhanlou for Intellectual Property Watch
Link (CC-BY-NC-SA)

More than 50 members of the United States Congress today sent a letter urging the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and National Institutes of Health (NIH) to exercise their legal authority to require medical patents that have emerged from government-funded medical research projects to be licensed on reasonable and affordable terms for public use. Continue reading »

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Creative Commons Summit: Next Steps in Copyright Reform

 Posted by on November 9, 2015  Comments Off on Creative Commons Summit: Next Steps in Copyright Reform
Nov 092015
 

cc summit[Originally posted on the Communia Blog, Link] The Creative Commons Summit, a bi-annual meeting of members of the CC network and friends of the Commons, took place in mid-October in Seoul, South Korea. One of the event’s tracks was devoted to copyright reform advocacy. The track was organised by member organisations of Communia, including Creative Commons.

In 2013, during the previous CC Summit, Creative Commons adopted a position on copyright reform. CC re-emphasized that even though the licenses are an essential mechanism to share creativity within the existing bounds of the law, it is now more important than ever to engage in a review and modernisation of copyright law itself. This commitment was confirmed during this year event. Continue reading »

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Does Compulsory Licensing Discourage Invention? Evidence from German Patents after World War I

 Posted by on October 29, 2015  Comments Off on Does Compulsory Licensing Discourage Invention? Evidence from German Patents after World War I
Oct 292015
 

baten-bianchi-moserAuthors: Joerg Baten, Nicola Bianchi, and Petra Moser

Abstract: This paper investigates whether compulsory licensing – which allows governments to license patents without the consent of patent-owners – discourages invention. Our analysis exploits new historical data on German patents to examine the effects of compulsory licensing under the US Trading-with-the-Enemy Act on invention in Germany. We find that compulsory licensing was associated with a 28 percent increase in invention. Historical evidence indicates that, as a result of war-related demands, fields with licensing were negatively selected, so OLS estimates may underestimate the positive effects of compulsory licensing on future inventions. Continue reading »

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Chile Is Half-Way to Legally Killing Open Licenses for Audiovisual Works

 Posted by on October 1, 2015  Comments Off on Chile Is Half-Way to Legally Killing Open Licenses for Audiovisual Works
Oct 012015
 

chile flagChile is about to become the first country to successfully kill creative commons and other open licensing for audiovisual works with a copyright bill that has been already approved in the House of Representatives  in an unprecedented fast speed. It is now in the Senate. This dream bill for collective societies of rightholders is the Bill for Copyright for Audiovisual Authors.

Here is a link to the bill and the legislative discussions.  Here is how it works against open licensing: Continue reading »

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Aug 132015
 

rcp-lcaAuthors: Rodrigo Cetina Presuel and Loreto Corredoira y Alfonso

Abstract: In 2015, Spain’s new copyright law entered into effect including many new provisions including one that requires Universities to pay Collecting Societies for using manuals and textbooks made available online in virtual campuses. This license cannot be waived and means that Universities have to pay even for works released under free licenses, such as Creative Commons, and for works already in the public domain. This weakens the protection offered by limits such as the one in favor of educational uses (art. 32 of the Spanish copyright act) and also reduces the public domain as it establishes unalienable licenses for content no longer in copyright. Continue reading »

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100+ Organizations to President: Ensure Federally Funded Educational Resources Are Freely Available Under Open Licenses

 Posted by on August 10, 2015  Comments Off on 100+ Organizations to President: Ensure Federally Funded Educational Resources Are Freely Available Under Open Licenses
Aug 102015
 
(CC BY) Matt Wade

(CC BY) Matt Wade

Creative Commons USA and over 100 other groups have sent a letter to President Obama urging a policy to ensure that “educational materials created with federal funds… are made available to the public as Open Educational Resources to freely use, share, and build upon” through the use of open licenses. The letter further notes that “the global standard for public copyright licensing for copyrighted content is Creative Commons. Existing U.S. Government grant programs including the TAACCCT and First in the World Programs mentioned above, use the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY). Releasing materials under a standard license, such as CC-BY, allows for increased reuse and compatibility between materials produced by different institutions, including private charitable foundations and other national governments.” Continue reading »

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