Aug 252017
 

[Fifa Rahman for IP-Watch, Link (CC-BY-SA)]  Gilead’s announcement today that they would include four middle-income countries (Malaysia, Thailand, Belarus, Ukraine) in their sofosbuvir voluntary licence was a welcome surprise, and will enable millions access to their highly effective, but exorbitantly priced, drug.

The decision to include these countries, however, no doubt is a response to increasing pressure from within these countries to either issue a compulsory licence (CL) or a government use licence (GUL), invalidate the sofosbuvir patents, or block data exclusivity for the drug. Continue reading »

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Losing the Myths on the TPPA: A Reply to IDEAS

 Posted by on November 17, 2015  Comments Off on Losing the Myths on the TPPA: A Reply to IDEAS
Nov 172015
 

fr-jl[Fifa Rahman and Joel Lexchin, The Malaysia Online, Link] On November 16, 2015 at the launch of the Intellectual Property Rights Index (IPRI) 2015 in Kuala Lumpur, IDEAS Malaysia, a libertarian think tank and proponent of the TPPA spoke about its October 2015 report “The Trans-Pacific Partnership: Seizing the Opportunities, Losing the Myths.”

IDEAS Malaysia attempted to debunk the legitimate concerns of the Malaysian AIDS Council, the World Health Organisation, Nobel prizewinner Médecins Sans Frontières (Doctors without Borders), the American Medical Students Association, among many other bodies working in public health and access to affordable medication, that TRIPS+ provisions in the TPP would reduce access to medicines and drive drug costs up. IDEAS, on the other hand, claims that there would be no increase in medicine prices under the TPP. Continue reading »

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Malaysian Parliamentarian Seeks Legislative Oversight of the TPP Negotiations; MITI Holds Public Consultation

 Posted by on August 4, 2013  Comments Off on Malaysian Parliamentarian Seeks Legislative Oversight of the TPP Negotiations; MITI Holds Public Consultation
Aug 042013
 

malaysian flagNurul Izzah Anwar, Member of Parliament for Lembah Pantai and Vice President of KEADILAN, has called for the creation of a Parliamentary Select Committee on the Trans Pacific Partnership.  She further stated that the agreement must be ratified by Parliament before signing.

In an op-ed published in the Malay Mail she warned that “…There are many other contentious issues which, if agreed to in a signed TPPA, will adversely affect Malaysians. These include higher medicine prices due to stronger patents, new rules which the TPPA will ask the country to adopt as domestic policies such as how the government spends its money (government procurement) and the operations of state enterprises. The freedom to make or change our own policies will be curbed.” Continue reading »

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Malaysia Publishes Trans Pacific Partnership Brief Highlighting IPR “Challenges”

 Posted by on June 28, 2013  Comments Off on Malaysia Publishes Trans Pacific Partnership Brief Highlighting IPR “Challenges”
Jun 282013
 

malaysian flagThe Malaysian Ministry of International Trade and Industry has published a brief outlining how it views the current state of the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations.  It believes that 14 of the 29 chapters of the agreement, It considers the negotiation of 14 of the 29 chapters to be “substantially closed.”  On the other hand, it says that negotiations in the areas of intellectual property, state owned enterprises, labor, and environment are “difficult.

For these sensitive issues, options that have been put forth have been “watered-down commitments; longer transition periods for implementation; limiting commitments through the Non-Conforming Lists; and absolute carve-outs.”  The brief signals that Malaysia would be willing to consider other options to move forward as well. Continue reading »

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Patent Provisions of TPP Raise Concerns in Malaysian Health Ministry, Civil Society

 Posted by on August 8, 2012  Comments Off on Patent Provisions of TPP Raise Concerns in Malaysian Health Ministry, Civil Society
Aug 082012
 

Malaysian government officials and civil society have recently spoken out against the TRIPS-Plus provisions in the Trans Pacific Partnership.  Health Minister Datuk Seri Liow Tiong Lai recently told the Sun that “We are against the patent extension” that will lead to delayed generic competition, and therefore less affordable medicines for the public.  Edward Low from the Positive Malaysian Treatment Access & Advocacy Group (MTAAG+) told Bloomberg that the agreement is “not good for the poor countries.”  Continue reading »

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