Jun 292011
 

CC - Essjay NZ

Recent U.S. free trade agreements have included language regulating the way in which member countries manage their pharmaceutical drug coverage and reimbursement programs.  The U.S.-Australia agreement was the first to such provisions, followed by the U.S.-Korea agreement which expanded upon the language included in the Australia agreement.  Currently U.S. Trade Representatives are negotiating the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement, which is likely to include language very similar to that in the Korea agreement.

The restrictions contained in the Korea agreement apply to health care programs operated at the “central level of government,” defined as “entities that are part of or have been established by a Party’s central level of government to operate or administer its health care programs.”[1] Applicable health care programs are “programs in which the health care authorities of a Party’s central level of government make the decisions regarding” coverage and reimbursement of pharmaceuticals. Continue reading »

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Jun 292011
 

The U.S. has recently begun to include in free trade agreements provisions regarding government health care programs which reimburse entities for prescription drugs.  The U.S.-Australia free trade agreement was the first to include such provisions, followed by the U.S.-Korea Free Trade Agreement (Korea FTA).  Similar language is likely to be included in the Trans-Pacific Partnership Free Trade Agreement (TPP FTA), which includes Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, and Vietnam.[1] Continue reading »

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Jun 242011
 

Recent free trade agreements with Korea and Australia have included provisions regulating pharmaceutical reimbursement programs operated at the “central level of government” of member countries.  Currently, the U.S. is in negotiations to complete the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement, which insiders say will likely include language similar to that in the Korea agreement.  Each of these agreements binds all signing parties to the provisions it contains—including the U.S.  Compliance with these agreements could require significant changes to American federal health care programs. Continue reading »

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Jun 212011
 

As the latest round of negotiations for the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) free trade agreement starts this week in Vietnam, some member countries are publicly defending their prescription drug reimbursement programs.  If the TPP agreement contains language similar to the pharmaceutical chapter of the Korea free trade agreement—which sources say is a likely possibility—they may have reason to worry.  For example, New Zealand’s government prescription drug program, Pharmac, has been under attack by the U.S. pharmaceutical industry, and may have to be modified to be compliant with the TPP agreement. Continue reading »

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Jun 212011
 

The U.S. has recently begun to include in free trade agreements provisions regarding government health care programs which reimburse entities for prescription drugs.  The U.S.-Australia free trade agreement was the first to include such provisions, followed by the U.S.-Korea Free Trade Agreement (Korea FTA).  Similar language is likely to be included in the Trans-Pacific Partnership Free Trade Agreement (TPP FTA), which includes Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, and Vietnam.[i] Continue reading »

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