Call for Participants for Spanish-Language Online Course on Open Internet

 Posted by on February 23, 2015  Comments Off on Call for Participants for Spanish-Language Online Course on Open Internet
Feb 232015
 

open internet courseI am writing to you as part of the International Policy team at the Washington-based digital rights group, Public Knowledge, to alert you to a free and open Spanish-language online course called “Open Internet” (Internet Abierto Y Libre) that we are launching early March 2015. This course may be of interest to you, your students, or grantees as an opportunity to build a deeper understanding of the intersection of human rights and the Internet, and we’d love if you could share this information throughout your networks. Continue reading »

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The fight over net neutrality in Brazil: a new and taller bump in the road for Marco Civil

 Posted by on June 11, 2013  Comments Off on The fight over net neutrality in Brazil: a new and taller bump in the road for Marco Civil
Jun 112013
 
Carolina Rossini

Carolina Rossini

On May 23, Brazil’s federal communications commission – ANATEL – passed a resolution with sweeping implications for internet service provision, net neutrality, and regulatory power. Resolution 614/2013 extends ANATEL’s regulatory reach from its traditional home in telecommunications systems all the way into the provision of internet services. This extension and others like it can significantly impact the internet access market in Brazil. These over-reaches also pose serious challenges to net neutrality policies pending in the Marco Civil legislation (known internationally as Brazil’s “Constitution for the Internet”). Continue reading »

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The Brazilian Congress Needs To Pass Marco Civil for Brazilians – and The World

 Posted by on May 22, 2013  Comments Off on The Brazilian Congress Needs To Pass Marco Civil for Brazilians – and The World
May 222013
 

brazil-flagCarolina Rossini is Project Director, Latin America Resource Center, New America Foundation

Tim Berners-Lee’s visit to Brazil last week has rekindled hopes for a civil society frustrated by six postponed votes on the bill known as “Marco Civil.” This groundbreaking federal legislation would guarantee civil rights in the use of the Internet, and is sometimes called a “Constitution for the Internet.” For the bill’s rapporteur, Representative Molon, having the inventor of the World Wide Web visit and publicly support the Marco Civil is an essential step in breaking the legislative logjam. Continue reading »

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