Jun 212017
 

Delia Browne, University of Auckland

The Copyright Amendment (Disability Access and Other Measures) Bill 2017 (the Bill) was passed on Thursday 15 June 2017 and will become law sometime in late December this year (six months from Royal Assent)

See here for a copy of the Bill.
See here for a copy of the Explanatory Memorandum (EM).​

The new law includes a number of reforms that have been sought by the education sector for years.  These include  Continue reading »

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Jun 052017
 

The South African Parliament’s Portfolio Committee on Trade and Industry, which is currently considering the Copyright Amendment Bill [B13-2017], has extended the deadline for the public to submit comments, and has postponed the public hearings which will now be held in August.

The formal notice seeking comments on the legislation – with the new dates – is available here (PDF). Continue reading »

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May 302017
 

South Africa has released the 2017 Copyright Amendment Bill for public comment.  The Portfolio Committee on Trade and Industry will accept written comments from the public through June 19, and will hold public hearings on the legislation June 27-29.

Instruction for submissions and further information on the hearing are here.

Six legal scholars from the Global Expert network on Copyright User Rights have sent an open letter to Parliamentarians to applaud the government for the Bill’s strengthening of user rights, and to make two suggestions.  Continue reading »

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Peruvian Congressional Health Commission Declares the Drug Atazanavir to Be in the Public Interest

 Posted by on May 26, 2017  Comments Off on Peruvian Congressional Health Commission Declares the Drug Atazanavir to Be in the Public Interest
May 262017
 

English translation of a joint press release by eight Peruvian civil society organizations.  Tranlation by Justin Mendoza (Access to Medicines Organizer, Public Citizen).  The original press release in Spanish is available here, and the text is reproduced below.

[CONTACT: MARLON CASTILLO – Phone: 942118412]  Lima, May 25, 2017 – The Congress of the Republic’s Health Commission approved by majority vote Draft Law 275/2016-CR, which proposes to declare the medicine Atazanavir to be in the public interest. Atazanavir is used in antiretroviral therapy for people living with HIV and has cost the Peruvian government over 75 million soles over-expenditure in the past four years due to the monopoly held by the pharmaceutical company Bristol Myers Squibb for its brand-name version of the drug, known as Reyataz. Continue reading »

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Why Copyright Law Poses a Barrier to Canada’s Artificial Intelligence Ambitions

 Posted by on May 18, 2017  Comments Off on Why Copyright Law Poses a Barrier to Canada’s Artificial Intelligence Ambitions
May 182017
 

[michaelgeist.ca, Link (CC-BY)] The federal government placed a big bet in this year’s budget on Canada becoming a world leader in artificial intelligence (AI), investing millions of dollars on a national strategy to support research and commercialization. The hope is that by attracting high-profile talent and significant corporate support, the government can turn a strong AI research record into an economic powerhouse. Funding and personnel have been the top policy priorities, yet other barriers to success remain. For example, Canada’s restrictive copyright rules may hamper the ability of companies and researchers to test and ultimately bring new AI services to market. Continue reading »

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The Global Battle Over Copyright Reform: Developing the Rule of Law in the Chinese Business Context

 Posted by on May 1, 2017  Comments Off on The Global Battle Over Copyright Reform: Developing the Rule of Law in the Chinese Business Context
May 012017
 

Author: Shruti Rana

Abstract: Nations and businesses around the globe have been battling over copyright protection laws, with industrialized nations pressuring developing nations to adopt “Western-style” copyright regimes. These battles are escalating as copyright piracy grows, while developing nations struggle to formulate reforms that will protect their own intellectual property as well as that of industrialized nations. Continue reading »

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Overview of the Kuwaiti Copyright Law of 2016

 Posted by on April 19, 2017  Comments Off on Overview of the Kuwaiti Copyright Law of 2016
Apr 192017
 

[Riyadh Al Balushi, Link (CC-BY-SA)]  Kuwait passed a new Copyright and Neighbouring rights Law in June 2016. This is new law replaces the 1999 copyright law – the first copyright law that Kuwait ever had. This new law is probably motivated by Kuwait’s accession to the Berne Convention in 2014.

The new Kuwaiti Copyright Law of 2016 does not give authors drastically more rights than what they used to. Both the 1999 and the 2016 laws offer a broadly worded economic rights section that does NOT restrict economic rights to specific activities such as reproducing, adapting, performing, etc, but instead widely state that the author has the right to permit and prohibit the use and exploitation of his works and provide reproduction, adaptation, performance, and other rights as examples of the rights that authors have over their works. This obviously goes beyond what is required by the Berne Convention and all other copyright treaties. Continue reading »

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Joint Letter to Congressional Leadership Supporting the Open, Permanent, Electronic, and Necessary (OPEN) Government Data Act

 Posted by on April 18, 2017  Comments Off on Joint Letter to Congressional Leadership Supporting the Open, Permanent, Electronic, and Necessary (OPEN) Government Data Act
Apr 182017
 

Photo by C.E. Kent (CC-BY)

The following letter was sent by 80+ organizations to the leadership of the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs and the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. For a printable PDF, click here.

We, the undersigned businesses, industry groups, civil society organizations, and transparency advocates, write to express our strong support for the bipartisan Open, Permanent, Electronic, and Necessary (OPEN) Government Data Act (S. 760). This bill, which unanimously passed the Senate in 2016, would establish a comprehensive policy across the federal government to ensure that government data is accessible to the public by default. Continue reading »

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The Web Is At A Crossroads – New Standard Enables Copyright Enforcement Violating Users’ Rights

 Posted by on April 15, 2017  Comments Off on The Web Is At A Crossroads – New Standard Enables Copyright Enforcement Violating Users’ Rights
Apr 152017
 

[Parminder Jeet Singh, IP Watch, Link (CC-BY-NC-SA)  The World Wide Web today stands at a crossroads, as its standards body, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), considers the demand of big content providers to provide them with the facility to be able to control user devices for ensuring that their content is not copied. This facility is called the Encrypted Media Extension (EME), which enables these companies to put digital rights management (DRM) into the user’s browser, whether the user wants it or not, and whether such restrictions are as per the user’s local national laws or not. Continue reading »

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Feb 282017
 

At the Australian Digital Alliance Forum, the first keynote from the Productivity Commission’s Deputy Chair Karen Chester busted myths about fair use. “Fair use has become not a nice-to-have, or even a good-to-have, but a policy must-have,” she said. She also charged in Q&A that those myths are being fecklessly promoted by industry actors. Continue reading »

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Fair Use in Korea

 Posted by on February 27, 2017  1 Response »
Feb 272017
 

The following presentation was given on February 24 at the 2017 Australian Digital Alliance Copyright Forum.  The slides are here.

Thank you for inviting me to the ADA Copyright Forum. I am more than delighted to be able to introduce the Korean experience on fair use. Frankly speaking, it is risky business to introduce fair use doctrine in a civil law country like Korea. Since Korea is a risk-taking country rather than a risk-averse country, Korea decided to introduce the fair use doctrine six years ago. We did so because the fair use doctrine can drive innovations for the industry, for users or works, and for creators in a fast changing internet environment. Actually, for more than thirty years, Korea has strengthened copyright for the benefit of creators. Many scholars including myself have raised serious questions about what happened to users’ rights under the Copyright Act of Korea. During the course of debates and discussion to strike a good balance between apparently conflicting interests of creators and users, Korea has faced two options. One option was to expand the scope of exceptions. Another option was to introduce a general clause on fair use. Korea opted for the second choice in 2011. Now, let me take a brief look at some cases. Continue reading »

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Fair Dealing: To Replace or Reinstate?

 Posted by on February 24, 2017  1 Response »
Feb 242017
 

[Teresa Hackett, Electronic Information for Libraries, Link (CC-BY)] EIFL is participating in Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week, an annual celebration designed to highlight and promote the opportunities presented by fair use and fair dealing, celebrate success stories, and explain these doctrines. Over 40 countries around the world have fair use or fair dealing in their copyright laws. In this blog, Teresa Hackett, EIFL’s Copyright and Libraries Programme Manager, discusses the evolution of fair dealing in the copyright laws of five EIFL partner countries: Botswana, Ghana, Malawi, Lesotho, Myanmar and Uganda. Continue reading »

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