Mar 312014
 

IFPI coverThe IFPI (International Federation of the Phonographic Industry) released its annual digital music report last week. It reports a strong (51.3%) growth in digital subscription services, as well as growth from ad-supported streaming services.

Like previous IFPI digital music reports, it contains sections describing the industry’s efforts against online infringement, but it also contains sections about its efforts to adjust to the new online environment. One interesting bit, reported by the Star, is that “recording industry is making more money from fan-made mashups, lip-syncs and tributes on YouTube than from official music videos.” Continue reading »

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Mar 272014
 

davis-larsenTwo representatives have submitted a joint comment to the U.S. Trade Representative in response to its request for input on its proposed Public Interest Trrade Advisory Committee (PITAC).  Reps. Davis and Larsen urge that the public advisory system should promote “three key values: balance, participation and inclusion.” Continue reading »

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Mar 132014
 

Palmedo300x300USTR has proposed a differential treatment approach to the Trans Pacific Partnership intellectual property negotiations.  The text would continue to include numerous TRIPS-Plus obligations favorable to branded pharmaceutical companies that restrict countries’ ability to craft laws and execute policies intended to maximize access to generic medicines. Analyses of the provisions found in the most recently leaked draft are available at infojustice.org/tpp-leak-analysis. USTR’s differential treatment proposal would exempt countries that do not meet the “high income” classification as defined by the World Bank – currently $12,616 GNI per capita – from three (not all) of these provisions. Malaysia, Mexico, Peru, and Vietnam do not meet the High Income threshold; though it has been pointed out that Malaysia and Mexico (both “Upper Middle Income” countries) are approaching it. Continue reading »

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Mar 102014
 

oew2014_banner[Cross posted from CCUSA, Link (CC-BY)] Today, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition organized a Congressional briefing on Open Educational Resources (OER) for Open Education Week. One speaker, Daniel DeMarte, described the experience that Tidewater Community College has had in rolling out it’s “Z-Degree” – an associate degree in business administration that uses a curriculum composed of entirely of OER. Continue reading »

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Mar 062014
 

cato institute logoYesterday the Cato Institute held an event titled “Intellectual Property in the Trans-Pacific Partnership: National Interest or Corporate Handout?”  The panel, moderated by Cato’s Simon Lester, featured Tom Giovanetti (Institute for Policy Innovation), William Watson (Cato), and Margot Kaminski (Yale Information Society Project).  The video of the event is here.

Lester opened the panel, noting that in the 1990s, trade experts discussed intellectual property in vague terms, not really understanding the particulars.  At the time, bringing IP into the trade realm increased support for free trade.  Today, however, people have realized the implications of stronger intellectual property protections, and it is causing trouble.  The inclusion of intellectual property in the trade regime is generating opposition to trade agreements as much as it increasing support for them.  Lester raised the possibility that debates over global intellectual property norms are better left to WIPO.  He asked the panelist to address the issue of whether trade should remain part of the trade realm, and if so, what the rules ought to be. Continue reading »

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Feb 192014
 

Palmedo croppedThe U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) is currently investigating “Indian industrial policies that discriminate against U.S. imports… and the effect those barriers have on the U.S. economy and U.S. jobs.” The investigation was requested by Sen. Hatch, Sen. Baucus, Rep. Camp, and Rep. Levin, and the final report is due to be released in November.  Last week it held a series of hearings, where it heard from U.S. business, Indian business, and civil society representatives.

I’ve posted notes on the thee panels here, here, and here.  KEI has videos of the hearings here. Continue reading »

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Feb 172014
 

ITCThe U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) investigation of Trade, Investment, and Industrial Policies in India: Effects on the U.S. Economy held its second and third hearing on Friday, February 14.  This blog contains notes on the third hearing, which was focused on IP and pharmaceuticals. Witnesses from PhRMA, Sonecon, Bayer, Knowledge Ecology International, Médecins Sans Frontières, and Public Citizen testified.   Notes on the ITC investigation’s first panel are here, and notes on the second panel are here.  Videos of the hearings have been posted here by Knowledge Ecology International. Continue reading »

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Feb 162014
 

ITCThe U.S. International Trade Commission’s investigation of Trade, Investment, and Industrial Policies in India: Effects on the U.S. Economy held its second and third hearing on Friday, February 14.  This blog contains notes on the parts of the second hearing related to intellectual property.  Notes on the first are here, and notes on the third are here.  Videos of the hearings have been posted here by Knowledge Ecology International.

Pallavi Shroff from the Confederation of Indian Industry opened her testimony describing strong growth of the overall Indian economy, of U.S. exports to India, and of American Drug companies’ market share. Continue reading »

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Feb 152014
 

ITCOn February 12, the International Trade Commission held its first day of a two day hearing on Trade, Investment, and Industrial Policies in India: Effects on the U.S. Economy.

Last August, Sen. Baucus, Sen. Hatch, Rep. Camp and Rep Levin requested that the Commission provide a report on “Indian industrial policies that discriminate against U.S. imports and investment for the sake of supporting Indian domestic industries.” The report, due November 2014, is supposed to address a series of questions, which include the effect of intellectual property policies. Continue reading »

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Feb 102014
 

ustr-logoLast Friday, an interagency committee led by the U.S. Trade Representative received comments for the 2014 Special 301 Review.  This annual review is a process in which it identifies countries that allegedly “deny adequate and effective protection of intellectual property rights (IPR) or deny fair and equitable market access to U.S. persons who rely on intellectual property protection.” As part of the review, comments are accepted from the general public, and they have now been posted online.  The next step of the review will be a public hearing on February 24.  There will be private consultations with other stakeholders and government officials, and a final report will be issued “on or about April 30.” Continue reading »

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Jan 312014
 

uschamberlogoEarlier this week, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce released the second edition of its Global Intellectual Property Index, a report which grades countries on the strength of their IP protection.  This year’s index covers 25 countries, including all of the BRICS and most of the countries in the TPP negotiations.  Countries are evaluated among 30 individual factors, which fall into one of six categories – Patents, Related Rights, and Limitations; Copyrights, Related Rights, and Limitations; Trademarks, Related Rights, and Limitations; Trade Secrets and Market Access; Enforcement; and Membership and Ratification of International Treaties.   The full index is here, and the summary is here. Continue reading »

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Jan 292014
 
Sen. Orrin Hatch

Sen. Orrin Hatch

This morning, Sen. Orrin Hatch spoke about international intellectual property issues at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.  He was the keynote at the organization’s launch of the second edition of its Global Intellectual Property Index.  A video of the event is here, and Sen. Hatch takes the podium at 9:45.

Sen. Hatch argued that American history has shown strong intellectual property (IP) leads to prosperity. Research has shown that increased IP leads all countries to enjoy greater foreign direct investment, technology transfer and innovation. However, the “lesson is lost” in the developing world where countries try to develop through “short cuts” that “undermine” and “steal” U.S. innovation.  India is the biggest battlefront, and Indian compulsory licenses based on nonworking are a big problem. Hatch warned that nothing in India’s patent laws limit compulsory licenses to pharmaceuticals, and he warned that other fields of technology such as cell phones or jets could be subject to compulsory licenses too.  Continue reading »

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