Jul 122017
 

[Mark Schweizer for IP Kat, Link (CC-BY)] According to its media release of 11 July 2017, the German Federal Court of Justice confirmed the decision of the Federal Patent Court granting Merck a compulsory license to EP 1 422 218 owned by Shionogi. This allows Merck the continued distribution of its antiretroviral drug Isentress, an approved medication for treatment of HIV-patients, on the German market.

The case is highly unusual not only because compulsory licenses are exceptionally rarely granted under German law, but also because the license was granted in preliminary proceedings, which is a first. Continue reading »

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More Evidence From Germany: Ancillary Copyright Still Not Working

 Posted by on October 23, 2015  Comments Off on More Evidence From Germany: Ancillary Copyright Still Not Working
Oct 232015
 

communia[Paul Keller, Communia Association, Link (CC-0)] Over the last month the German publishers who are pushing for ancillary copyright for press publishers on the EU level have encountered two more setbacks in their attempts to turn the ancillary rights that they have in Germany into actual revenue.

Freedom to link upheld: First the Bundeskartellamt (the German competition authority) rejected claims made by the publishers that Google has acted in violation of competition rules by removing from its search results text snippets from publishers who have not granted them a royalty-free license. Google had started removing such snippets after the introduction of the ancillary copyright for press publishers to avoid having to pay for displaying the snippets. Continue reading »

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Presenting ‘Copy Culture in the US and Germany’

 Posted by on January 16, 2013  Comments Off on Presenting ‘Copy Culture in the US and Germany’
Jan 162013
 
Joe Karaganis

Joe Karaganis

Copy Culture in the US and Germany is a comparative study of digital culture, focusing on media consumption, media acquisition, and attitudes toward copyright enforcement. The study is based on a large-scale phone survey of Americans and Germans in late 2011. Continue reading »

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