Oct 262017
 

Reposted from michaelgeist.ca, Link (CC-BY)

It is open access week and this year I had the honour of delivering the keynote address at a terrific open access event co-sponsored by the Ryerson University Library and Archives and the University of Toronto Libraries. My talk – which can be viewed in full here or from the embed below – starts with a review of the remarkable success of open access over the past 15 years, but quickly shifts toward the continuing connection between balanced copyright and open access. Continue reading »

Share

Joint Letter to Congressional Leadership Supporting the Open, Permanent, Electronic, and Necessary (OPEN) Government Data Act

 Posted by on April 18, 2017  Comments Off on Joint Letter to Congressional Leadership Supporting the Open, Permanent, Electronic, and Necessary (OPEN) Government Data Act
Apr 182017
 

Photo by C.E. Kent (CC-BY)

The following letter was sent by 80+ organizations to the leadership of the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs and the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. For a printable PDF, click here.

We, the undersigned businesses, industry groups, civil society organizations, and transparency advocates, write to express our strong support for the bipartisan Open, Permanent, Electronic, and Necessary (OPEN) Government Data Act (S. 760). This bill, which unanimously passed the Senate in 2016, would establish a comprehensive policy across the federal government to ensure that government data is accessible to the public by default. Continue reading »

Share
Dec 162016
 

Photo by C.E. Kent (CC-BY)

[Alex Howard, Sunlight Foundation, Link (CC-BY)] Amidst unanswered questions about the future of open government in the United States, the Senate has provided a unanimous endorsement of a set of enduring principles that the Sunlight Foundation has advanced and defended for a decade: that data created using the funds of the people should be available to the people in open formats online, without cost or restriction.

On Dec. 10, 2016, S.2852, the Open, Public, Electronic, and Necessary (OPEN) Government Data Act, passed the Senate with an amendment by unanimous consent. The OPEN Government Data Act has been a core priority of the Sunlight Foundation in Washington in 2016. We are thrilled that the Senate has acted to move it and grateful to the bill’s co-sponsors for their support for open government. Continue reading »

Share

WIPO Adopts Open Access Policy for its Publications

 Posted by on November 16, 2016  Comments Off on WIPO Adopts Open Access Policy for its Publications
Nov 162016
 

wipo logo[WIPO Press Release] The World Intellectual Property Organization today announced its new Open Access policy to promote the widest possible public access to its publications, furthering the Organization’s commitment to the dissemination and sharing of knowledge. Continue reading »

Share

Why I Came To Believe CRS Reports Should be Publicly Available (and Built a Website to Make it Happen)

 Posted by on November 2, 2016  Comments Off on Why I Came To Believe CRS Reports Should be Publicly Available (and Built a Website to Make it Happen)
Nov 022016
 

dsDaniel Schuman, Demand Progress, Link (CC-BY)

I first started working for Congress as a senate intern in September 2001. I was 23 years old and had no experience working on policy. I found myself responding to letters from constituents on issues that I’d never heard of previously. It was then that I first encountered the Congressional Research Service and its reports. Continue reading »

Share

Open Access Policy In Practice: A Perspective from the Wellcome Trust

 Posted by on October 25, 2016  Comments Off on Open Access Policy In Practice: A Perspective from the Wellcome Trust
Oct 252016
 

cc2Timothy Vollmer, Creative Commons, Link (CC-BY)

It’s Open Access Week 2016. Open Access Week is an annual week-long event that highlights the importance of sharing scientific and scholarly research and data. Its goal is to educate people on the benefits of open publishing, advocate for changes to policy and practice, and build a community to collaborate on these issues. This year’s theme is open in action. Today we are exploring open access policy within philanthropy by interviewing Robert Kiley from the Wellcome Trust. From brokering the Bermuda Principles for immediate sharing of DNA sequence data in 1996 to being the first funder to mandate open access to our funded publication in 2005, Wellcome has been at the forefront of open research for over two decades. Continue reading »

Share

United Nations Report Calls for Open Access to Research to Improve Global Health

 Posted by on October 6, 2016  Comments Off on United Nations Report Calls for Open Access to Research to Improve Global Health
Oct 062016
 

cc2[Tim Vollmer, Creative Commons, Link (CC-BY)] Last month the United Nations released a report with recommendations on how to improve innovation and access to health technologies. The panel’s charge called for it to “recommend solutions for remedying the policy incoherence between the justifiable rights of inventors, international human rights law, trade rules and public health in the context of health technologies.”

Of particular interest are the panel’s suggestions for managing intellectual property generated from publicly-funded research. From the report: Continue reading »

Share

How Trade Agreements Harm Open Access and Open Source

 Posted by on October 22, 2015  Comments Off on How Trade Agreements Harm Open Access and Open Source
Oct 222015
 

oaw green[EFF Deeplinks, Link (CC-BY)]  Open access isn’t explicitly covered in any of the secretive trade negotiations that are currently underway, including the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), the Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), and the Trade In Services Agreement (TISA). But that doesn’t mean that they won’t have a negative impact on those seeking to publish or use open access materials. Continue reading »

Share
Aug 282015
 
Photo by Ito (CC-BY-2.0)

Photo by Ito (CC-BY-2.0)

Abstract: Sharing research data by depositing it in connection with a published article or otherwise making data publicly available sometimes raises intellectual property questions in the minds of depositing researchers, their employers, their funders, and other researchers who seek to reuse research data. In this context or in the drafting of data management plans, common questions are (1) what are the legal rights in data; (2) who has these rights; and (3) how does one with these rights use them to share data in a way that permits or encourages productive downstream uses? Leaving to the side privacy and national security laws that regulate sharing certain types of data, this Perspective explains how to work through the general intellectual property and contractual issues for all research data.

Carroll MW (2015) Sharing Research Data and Intellectual Property Law: A Primer. PLoS Biol 13(8): e1002235. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1002235

Full Article: http://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/article?id=10.1371/journal.pbio.1002235

Share

SPARC Applauds Senate Committee Action on Public Access Legislation

 Posted by on July 29, 2015  Comments Off on SPARC Applauds Senate Committee Action on Public Access Legislation
Jul 292015
 

sparc logoSPARC press release, Link (CC-BY)
Contact: Ranit Schmelzer
202-5380-1065 | sparcmedia@arl.org

Washington, DC –The Senate Homeland Security & Governmental Affairs Committee (HSGAC) today passed S. 779, the Fair Access to Science and Technology Research (FASTR) Act, unanimously by voice vote and moved it to the full Senate for consideration. This marks the first time the Senate has acted on a government-wide policy ensuring public access to the results of publicly funded research, and is an important step towards codifying the progress made by the 2013 White House OSTP Directive. Continue reading »

Share

Amplifying the Impact of Open Access: Wikipedia and the Diffusion of Science

 Posted by on July 24, 2015  Comments Off on Amplifying the Impact of Open Access: Wikipedia and the Diffusion of Science
Jul 242015
 

Teplitsky-Lu-DuedeAuthors: Misha Teplitskiy, Grace Lu, and Eamon Duede

Abstract: With the rise of Wikipedia as a first-stop source for scientific knowledge, it is important to compare its representation of that knowledge to that of the academic literature. This article approaches such a comparison through academic references made within the world’s 50 largest Wikipedias. Continue reading »

Share

Wiki-nomics: Bringing Institutions Back into the Analysis of Copyright with a Case Study of Wikipedia

 Posted by on February 16, 2015  Comments Off on Wiki-nomics: Bringing Institutions Back into the Analysis of Copyright with a Case Study of Wikipedia
Feb 162015
 

SONY DSCAuthor:  Ryan Safner

Abstract: Wikipedia, the free online encyclopedia, stands as a highly visible success story of an organization that provides a public good, when formal theory implies it should not exist. The modern literature on intellectual property rights places the emphasis on extending the logic of property rights to intangibles, and focuses on a static tradeoff between providing incentives to overcome the free rider problem of providing a public good, and providing too much monopoly power. Continue reading »

Share