Nov 162017
 

[William New, IP Watch, Link (CC-BY-SA)] Trade ministers negotiating the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement have released the list of provisions they have suspended, including a range of articles related to intellectual property rights, such as patentable subject matter, test data protection, biologics, copyright terms of protection, and technological protection measures. Continue reading »

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Nov 152017
 

[Médecins Sans Frontières press release, Link] Ministers from the eleven countries* assessing the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade deal have suspended many of the damaging provisions that would have restricted access to medicines and vaccines, a victory for millions of people who rely on affordable medicines worldwide.

In the agreement, now called the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), which still has to be finalized, several of the TPP’s damaging intellectual property measures have been suspended. As originally written, the TPP—the worst trade deal ever for access to affordable medicines—would have extended pharmaceutical company monopolies, kept drug prices high, and prevented people and medical treatment providers from accessing lifesaving medicines by blocking or delaying the availability of price-lowering generic drugs in many countries. Continue reading »

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Nov 072017
 

SAVE THE DATE:
September 27-29, 2018
(0 days: Sept 24-26)

American University Washington College of Law’s Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property is pleased to announce the hosting of Fifth Global Congress on Intellectual Property and the Public Interest, September 27-29, 2018, Washington D.C.  As with previous meetings, we will have space available for self-organized project meetings and trainings in the preceding days – September 24-26. Continue reading »

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Nov 032017
 

France, Portugal and Spain have waded into the debate on the notorious Article 13 of the EU’s proposed Copyright Directive with a proposal that would oblige online content-sharing platforms to introduce mandatory automated filtering of uploads, as originally proposed by the Commission but recently questioned by a number of Member States.

Click here for the full story on Statewatch.org

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10th Annual International Open Access Week Shines Spotlight on Increasing the Impact of Research & Scholarship

 Posted by on October 23, 2017  Comments Off on 10th Annual International Open Access Week Shines Spotlight on Increasing the Impact of Research & Scholarship
Oct 232017
 

[Nick Shockey, SPARC, Link (CC-BY)] Hundreds of events will take place across the globe to highlight the power of Open Access to increase the impact of scientific and scholarly research during the 10th annual International Open Access Week taking place from October 23-29, 2017.

This year’s theme of “Open in Order to…” is meant to move the discussion beyond talking about openness itself and instead focus on what openness enables—in an individual discipline, at a particular institution, or in a specific context; then to take action to realize these benefits. The theme also recognizes the diverse contexts and communities within which the shift to Open Access is occurring and encourages specific discussion that will be most effective locally. Continue reading »

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TRIPS Council: Fears That Non-Violation Complaints Could Undercut Flexibilities In IP Trade Rules

 Posted by on October 20, 2017  Comments Off on TRIPS Council: Fears That Non-Violation Complaints Could Undercut Flexibilities In IP Trade Rules
Oct 202017
 

[Catherine Saez, IP Watch, Link (CC-BY-NC-SA)] World Trade Organization committee members this week were asked to recommend to the upcoming ministerial conference whether to lift or indefinitely prolong a moratorium shielding intellectual property from complaints between members not involving a breach of a WTO agreement. Short of a consensus, the intellectual property committee will have to reconvene next month to try to find agreement. Separately, a two-year extension was granted to countries not yet having ratified the public health amendment to WTO IP rules. Continue reading »

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CopyCamp 2017 – Summary

 Posted by on October 3, 2017  1 Response »
Oct 032017
 

[Reposted from https://copycamp.pl/en/ (CC-BY)]  The 6th CopyCamp took place in Warsaw on September 28th and 29th under the title „the Internet of Copyrighted Things”. This year we gathered 60 guests from 21 countries who shared their expertise during presentations and workshops with those who joined us in Kino Praha or watched our live streaming on YouTube. We listened to stories touching on real-life issues in culture, science, education, medicine and agriculture. And it was a great success! In the post-conference survey, our participants evaluated the conference with an average grade of 5,15 (with 6 being the maximum grade). Continue reading »

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DNDi Welcomes Malaysia’s Move to Secure Access to More Affordable Treatments for Hepatitis C

 Posted by on September 20, 2017  Comments Off on DNDi Welcomes Malaysia’s Move to Secure Access to More Affordable Treatments for Hepatitis C
Sep 202017
 

[Drugs for Neglected Diseases press release, Link (CC-BY-NC-SA)] Malaysia has issued a “government use” licence enabling access to more affordable versions of an expensive and patented medicine to treat hepatitis C. This landmark decision should help the more than 400,000 people living with hepatitis C in Malaysia access sofosbuvir, and could have important repercussions in the global effort to secure access to expensive treatments for this viral disease. Continue reading »

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Sep 182017
 

SPARC Europe, Link (CC-BY)

SPARC Europe is leading and collaborating with an international coalition in an effort to halt the adoption of harmful provisions found in the current draft of the Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market, and certain amendments, which could threaten Open Access and Open Science.

The coalition has written an open letter directed at the EU’s Legal Affairs Committee, which was delivered 6th September. In the letter, we urge for the removal of proposals that would restrict access to research and place administrative and legal burdens on institutional repositories. We also request improvements on proposals related to text and data mining, copyright in an education setting, and preservation and access to works for non-commercial endeavors.   Continue reading »

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Aug 292017
 

[Originally posted in The Conversation, Link (CC-BY-SA)] . As the new school year approaches, Canadian universities are grappling with the Federal Court of Canada’s recent copyright decision against York University.

The court ruled that York could not rely on its fair dealing policy and per-use licensing to copy works as a part of course packs, but must pay millions of dollars in licensing fees to Access Copyright, which sells blanket copyright licenses to organizations. Continue reading »

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Aug 252017
 

[Fifa Rahman for IP-Watch, Link (CC-BY-SA)]  Gilead’s announcement today that they would include four middle-income countries (Malaysia, Thailand, Belarus, Ukraine) in their sofosbuvir voluntary licence was a welcome surprise, and will enable millions access to their highly effective, but exorbitantly priced, drug.

The decision to include these countries, however, no doubt is a response to increasing pressure from within these countries to either issue a compulsory licence (CL) or a government use licence (GUL), invalidate the sofosbuvir patents, or block data exclusivity for the drug. Continue reading »

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How Licenses Give Access, But Can Also Take It Away

 Posted by on August 23, 2017  Comments Off on How Licenses Give Access, But Can Also Take It Away
Aug 232017
 

Release of the “Literature review on the use of licensing in library context, and the limitations this creates to access to knowledge”

[International Federation of Library Associations, Link (CC-BY] The way libraries acquire content is in transition. With a growing share of digital material in library collections, licences are a fact of life. However, and as many in the library world have already experienced, while licenses give access to knowledge, they can also restrict it.

IFLA’s Advisory Committee on Copyright and other Legal Matters has therefore commissioned a literature review on the use of licensing in library context, and the limitations this creates to access to knowledge. The study, written by Svetlana Yakovleva and released today, looks through the available research, from theoretical analyses to practical survey work on libraries’ experience of licensing. It identifies the main limitations associated with copyright licenses in the library context, sets out how they impact both access and use of digital content, and provides examples. Continue reading »

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