Innovation, Intellectual Property, and Development: A Better Set of Approaches for the 21st Century

 Posted by on October 20, 2017  Comments Off on Innovation, Intellectual Property, and Development: A Better Set of Approaches for the 21st Century
Oct 202017
 

Dean Baker[1], Arjun Jayadev[2] and Joseph Stiglitz[3]  | Full Paper (CC-BY)

Introduction:  The twenty first century global economy will differ from that of the twentieth in at least two critical ways. First, the weight of the developing world in the global economy will be substantially higher. In particular, emerging economies such as China, Brazil, India and South Africa will have a more important role to play based on their pace of growth. Second, the ‘weightless economy‘ – the economy of ideas, knowledge and information – will become an increasingly important fraction of economic output and ever more important for economic growth and development, both in developed and developing economies.

These two facts alone would suggest that economic institutions and laws created in the twentieth century, to manage the growth of currently advanced industrialised economies, will be increasingly inadequate to govern global economic activity. Nowhere is this more evident than in the area of intellectual property rights (IPRs). Continue reading »

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Effect of Piracy on Adoption of Technological Innovation

 Posted by on September 29, 2014  Comments Off on Effect of Piracy on Adoption of Technological Innovation
Sep 292014
 

abhishek-telang-zhangAuthors: Vibhanshu Abhishek, Rahul Telang, and Yi Zhang

Abstract: Advances in technology have enabled producers of entertainment goods to reach customers in innovative ways. However, new technologies also make it easier for users to infringe on the content. Producers argue that piracy hurts their ability to innovate, while critics argue that piracy acts as a leveler and encourages consumer friendly innovation. In this paper, we explore the interplay of piracy and technology adoption based on a dynamic model. In this model, the firm always releases a physical product initially and has to make a decision on whether and when to adopt the newer digital platform to facilitate digital release. New platform can help the producer target broader customer base, but can be costly and might lead to higher piracy. Continue reading »

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Excerpt from 2015 Obama Budget: “Open Government Assets As a Platform for Innovation and Job Creation”

 Posted by on March 5, 2014  Comments Off on Excerpt from 2015 Obama Budget: “Open Government Assets As a Platform for Innovation and Job Creation”
Mar 052014
 

whitehouseExcerpt from pages 41-42 of President Obama’s budget for 2015.  The full document is available here.

By opening up Government-generated assets including data and the fruits of federally funded research and development (R&D) — such as intellectual property and scientific publications — to the public, Government can empower individuals and businesses to significantly increase the public’s return on investment in terms of innovation, job creation, and economic prosperity. Continue reading »

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Dec 022013
 

stephan-kinsella-b-300x284[Stephen Kinsella, Center for the Study of Innovative Freedom, Link (CC-BY)] Patents are often used as indicators for economic and innovative progress.1 The assumption is that many patents represent innovation, and also that many innovations are patented. Patent records thus correlate with innovation.

A fascinating new paper, “Reassessing patent propensity: evidence from a data-set of R&D awards 1977-2004,” by Roberto Fontana, Alessandro Nuvolari, Hiroshi Shimizu, and Andrea Vezzulli (Department of Economics at the School of Economics and Management (ISEG), Technical University of Lisbon, Working Papers series number 2013/09; Mar. 2013), carefully examines this issue. The authors studied the innovations from the ”R&D 100 Awards” competition organized by the journal Research and Development, which, since 1963, “has been awarding this prize to the 100 most technologically significant new products available for sale or licensing in the year preceding the judgments.” I.e., this is a list of important and “technological breakthrough” innovations over almost 3 decades. Continue reading »

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Innovation, Intellectual Property Rights, and Economic Development: A Unified Empirical Investigation

 Posted by on March 15, 2013  Comments Off on Innovation, Intellectual Property Rights, and Economic Development: A Unified Empirical Investigation
Mar 152013
 

World Development CoverAuthors: John Hudson and Alexandru Minea

Abstract:  Two important strands of literature investigate the way the effect of intellectual property rights (IPR) on innovation depends on either the initial IPR level or the level of economic development. We expand on this by studying their joint effect, in a single, unified, empirical framework. We find that the effect of IPR on innovation is more complex than previously thought, displaying important nonlinearities depending on the initial levels of both IPR and per capita GDP. The policy implications of this are examined and include the conclusion that a single global level of IPR is in general sub-optimal. Continue reading »

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Boldrin and Levine: “The Case Against Patents”

 Posted by on October 30, 2012  Comments Off on Boldrin and Levine: “The Case Against Patents”
Oct 302012
 

Michele Boldrin and David K. Levine

The following is an excerpt from the full paper by Michele Boldrin and David K. Levine, published as a working paper for the St. Louis Federal Reserve.  The full paper is available here.

The case against patents can be summarized briefly: there is no empirical evidence that they serve to increase innovation and productivity, unless the latter is identified with the number of patents awarded – which, as evidence shows, has no correlation with measured productivity. This is at the root of the “patent puzzle”: in spite of the enormeous increase in the number of patents and in the strength of their legal protection we have neither seen a dramatic acceleration in the rate of technological progress nor a major increase in the levels of R&D expenditure Continue reading »

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2012 Global Innovation Index

 Posted by on July 13, 2012  Comments Off on 2012 Global Innovation Index
Jul 132012
 

Earlier this month, the 2012 Global Innovation Index (GII) was jointly published by WIPO and INSEAD.  The GII profiles 141 countries according to 84 indicators, which fit into the following categories: institutions, human capital and research, infrastructure, market sophistication, business sophistication, knowledge and technology outputs, and creative outputs.

The GII indicators include patent and trademark registrations by both domestic residents, though they do not include an overall measurement of the strength of IPR protection.  Continue reading »

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Intellectual Property, Innovation and Growth (presentation at TPP negotiation side event)

 Posted by on May 11, 2012  Comments Off on Intellectual Property, Innovation and Growth (presentation at TPP negotiation side event)
May 112012
 

Yesterday I gave a presentation on IPRs, technology and growth at the Dallas round of TPP negotiations.  The following blog is based on my presentation.  The slides I used are here.

Policymakers and US industry groups have been arguing that TRIPS-Plus intellectual property rights will drive growth and innovation in all of the countries involved in the TPP negotiations.  They often refer to studies of how IPRs work in the U.S., and assume that IPRs will have the same effects in other countries.  Of course, the U.S. has characteristics that are conductive to IPR-led growth, such as a large public R&D base and a competitive advantages in IP-intensive industries.  Continue reading »

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Senate HELP Committee to Hold Hearing on Prize Fund for HIV/AIDS Act

 Posted by on May 7, 2012  Comments Off on Senate HELP Committee to Hold Hearing on Prize Fund for HIV/AIDS Act
May 072012
 

On May 15, the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee will hold a hearing on S. 1138, the Prize Fund for HIV/AIDS Act.  The bill, introduced a year ago by Sen. Sanders, would provide direct support to innovators while allowing immediate generic competition upon approval of new treatments for HIV/AIDS.

As explained in a fact sheet from Sanders’ office: “The Prize Fund would reward useful investments in R&D for new treatment and manufacturing processes, and would lower the overall costs of treatments for HIV/AIDS by allowing introduction of generic medicines for HIV/AIDS as soon as they enter the market.  Continue reading »

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