The 2013 ‘Global Congress on IP and the Public Interest’ Research Survey

 

Between July and September, 2013, we surveyed members of the Global Congress community to learn more about their projects and priorities. We invited participation through email lists and solicited anyone who had either been to a Global Congress, been invited to one, or expressed interest in coming.  We received around 90 responses.

Rather than create an agenda document, we’ve decided to let the responses speak mostly for themselves.  We’ve split them into two parts: a searchable, sortable database for Current Projects (below) and a series of posts on Research Priorities (forthcoming on Infojustice) that compile perspectives on research opportunities and its relationship to policymaking in the next several years.

Here are the caveats: The responses are drawn from–but do not exhaustively reproduce–the responses we received.  Responses have been cherry picked, edited, and loosely organized under primary themes.  We favored detailed responses over lists of projects or statements of general interests or concerns.  The list is also quite limited: it attributes projects to the person or persons who reported it–not necessarily to all contributors to a project.   We can, of course, make adjustments where the attribution is clearly inadequate (let us know if that’s the case).  But we are not aiming for a rigorous accounting of the research field, just a useful one given the usual constraints on time and resources.  If this proves popular, we can discuss expanding it as part of future Global Congresses.

View all survey results

Topics

Governance, Participation, Trade Agreements

Public Health, Access to Medicines

Practices and Attitudes, Piracy / Informality, Public Understanding of Copyright

Tech Innovation Systems and Patents, Open Innovation, Tech Patents, Patent SystemUniversity Tech Transfer, Biological Patents

Creative Incentives and Remuneration, Collecting Societies, Licensing, Copyright’s Incentives, Remuneration, Creative IndustriesAlternative Business Models

Copyright Reform, Users’ Rights, Access to Cultural Goods, Educational Materials, Libraries

Enforcement, Privacy and Surveillance

Trademark, Geographical Indicators, Traditional Knowledge

IP/A2K Social Movements and Activism, Capacity Building

Adjacent Issues

Geographical Focus

Global, Latin America, Africa, MENA, Europe, South Asia, USA, Brazil, Australia, Canada, Poland, China, Russia, South Africa, India, Ethiopia

 

Priorities for Future Research

Intro and International Comparison and Cases
Copyright Reform, Users’ Rights, and Enforcement
Trade, Patents, and Health
Cultural Economies
Methods, Communication, and Social Movements

 

Want to Contribute 2-3 Paragraphs on Research Priorities?

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Primary Investigator(s) and/or Person Who Reported ItResearch VenueProject TitleTopic(s)Geographical FocusDescription
Susan SellGeorge Washington University, USACat and Mouse: The Battle over Intellectual Property Protection and EnforcementGovernance
Participation
Trade Agreements
Global"Cat and Mouse" is a book project that addresses both the proliferation of negotiating forums and the strategic shifting of forums (both horizontally and vertically) that have characterized global IP policy debates.
Nicola LucchiJonkoping International Business School, SwedenGoverning the Global Access to Information Resources: Policy, Politics and Strategy for a Better Regulation of Knowledge-Based Assets.’Governance
Participation
GlobalThe proposed research intends to investigate the conflict between technology and human rights principles proposing a new model of governance based on criteria of equity, efficiency and sustainability.
Sara BannermanMacMaster University, CanadaCopyright: A History of Access to KnowledgeGovernance
Participation
Europe
USA
Traditional histories of international copyright have showcased France, the United Kingdom, Germany, and the United States. The relative absence of other countries from the dominant history leaves a story with significant blind spots. This project examines the history of international copyright by foregrounding the ‘emerging countries’ of various historical periods. It hypothesizes that emerging and developing countries have almost always been proponents of expanded access to knowledge, and that this can be traced through the international history of copyright.
Eduardo Villanueva MansillaPontificia Universidad Catolica del PeruGovernance
Participation
PeruI'm working to analyze from a political science perspective the way that IP debates and copyright are defining the reach and bounds of the State, specifically a State like mine. Peru is a country bound by international treaties and bilateral trade agreements, but at the same time has a very intense alternative or irregular market for IP-protected content. This raises political questions around both Digital Rights / A2K policy, as well as foreign and internal policy regarding how to use the digital resources available to our collective advantage. My main target is to establish the new characteristics that the State in emerging economies and to understand the limitations posed both by the web of treaties and agreements and local and foreign users of the Web.
Miranda ForsythAustralian National UniversityGovernance
Participation
Asia-PacificMy current research project investigates the impact of intellectual property laws on development in Pacific Island countries, many of which are currently considering whether to introduce new or amend existing intellectual property legislation. Among the drivers of this process are negotiations to join the World Trade Organization and to complete bilateral Trade Agreements, including EU-Australia and Australia-New Zealand agreements. Another is concern that the traditional knowledge of the country is currently not adequately protected from the risk of exploitation by third parties. The main goal of the research is to better inform the decisions that will need to be made concerning these issues in the next few years.
Andrew RensDuke University, USAIntellectual property standard setting in AfricaGovernance
Participation
AfricaThis project considers constraints under which African countries engaging in regional standard setting operate. Hope for impact: to frame the policy debate on standard setting by the proposed pan African Intellectual Property Organization (PAIPO).
Gabriel J. MichaelGeorge Washington University, USAGovernance
Participation
Access to Medicines
Traditional Knowledge
GlobalMy dissertation studies the spread of intellectual property law around the globe, by applying theories of policy diffusion. Specifically, I examine the spread of data exclusivity protection for pharmaceutical clinical trials, which is an instance of policy diffusion from developed, Western, industrial nations to the rest of the world; another chapter focuses on the spread of national legislation on traditional knowledge, which is an instance of policy diffusion originating and spreading in the global South. One aim of my dissertation is to provide solid evidence, at both the macro and micro levels, that national adoption of intellectual property law frequently has little to do with cost/benefit analysis of the policy itself.
Sean Flynn
Mike Palmedo
American University Washington College of Law, USASpecial 301 Watch ProjectGovernance
Participation
USAThis project provides legal and technical assistance to civil society organizations seeking to make submissions in the annual USTR Special 301 Report process.
Sunil AbrahamCentre for Internet and Society, IndiaAnalyzing the Indo-EU Free Trade Agreement for IPR IssuesTrade AgreementsIndia
Europe
This is an ongoing project, running parallel to the negotiations around the Indo-EU FTA. The various provisions of the Free Trade Agreement (FTA) and the IP issues identified therein will be studied with the ultimate goal to ensure that there are no adverse changes proposed to India's IP regime, as it is generally seen as more favorable to the public interest than many EU regimes.
Sunil AbrahamCentre for Internet and Society, IndiaIndia's Obligations under Bilateral Investment TreatiesTrade AgreementsIndiaAn ongoing effort to understand and address the challenges that India's Bilateral Investment Treaties may pose to the establishment of patent pools in the country, with a particular focus on the compulsory licensing of information and communication technology.
Sean Flynn
Mike Palmedo
American University Washington College of Law, USAPublic Interest IP & Trade Advocacy at PIJIPTrade Agreements
Participation
GlobalPIJIP, at American University, is involved in ongoing efforts to engage with IP negotiators involved in the Trans Pacific Partnership negotiations, including organizing side meetings, stakeholder presentations, and analyses of the leaked provisions (infojustice.org/tpp). We also provide legal and technical assistance to public health organizations on the impact of trade agreement provisions on pharmaceutical pricing programs.
Andrew BridgesFenwick & West LLP, USATrade AgreementsGlobalI normally conduct litigation and engage in strategic business plan advice for commercial clients, so my work often reacts to client demand. But I am also independently studying a variety of issues including the relationship between foreign trade policy and domestic legislation regarding intellectual property, specifically copyright law and trademark law. One area of inquiry is what room international trade policy gives individual countries for the use of intellectual property law to express their own particular cultural values, given the "black letter law" statement that intellectual property laws are purely national. In whose interest is it for international trade agreements to harmonize the regulatory frameworks the express national cultural values? What is the purpose for conducting secret treaty and trade agreement negotiations that may either require or restrict national legislation, when the legislative process is normally public and (relatively) transparent? In whose interest is it for the creation of new intellectual property norms to be opaque or transparent?
J. Carlos LaraDerechos Digitales, ChileTrade AgreementsGlobalI have been conduct research in order to provide two-page documents regarding TPP issues, mostly concerning copyright provisions, TPMs, exceptions and limitations, enforcement, parallel importation, neighboring rights, intermediary liability. The aim was to provide national and foreign negotiators with further information concerning (leaked) TPP proposals; and also to provide tppabierto.net with updated information. While seemingly small-scale, these efforts go hand in hand with regular advocacy among politicians and civil society aiming at the rejection TPP, ensuring safeguards against its worst provisions, or at the very least opening up the process. The hoped-for impact is rejection of IP clauses in TPP.
Rochelle Dreyfuss
Cesar Rodrigues
NYU, USA
University of los Andes, Peru
Access to Medicine in Latin AmericaPublic Health
Access to Medicines
Latin AmericaThis edited book funded by IDRC is part of a project on global administrative law. We surveyed relevant actors in eleven Latin American countries on how they balanced demands for strong IP protection against the state's interest in preserving access to reasonably-priced medicines. We identified factors that led some countries to greater success in preserving access.
Chikosa BandaUniversity of Malawi, MalawiPatents and Promotion of Biomedical Research into Diseases Prevalent in Developing CountriesPublic Health
Access to Medicines
GlobalThis study considers the role of intellectual property rights (IPRs) in the promotion of biomedical research for the prevention and treatment of diseases that disproportionately affect impoverished countries using as a case study. I intend to examine global and domestic factors that contribute to the inequitable distribution of research resources/benefits between the developed world and poor countries.
Koichi KamedaFundação Vargas, BrazilPublic health, innovation and industrial policy: the development of a rapid test for HIV/Aids and hepatitis diagnostics in BrazilPublic Health
Access to Medicines
Brazil
Latin America
Main goal: to understand the recent initiatives of local production of health technology to address demands of the public health system, with a focus on the diagnostic tools for HIV and hepatitis. In contrast with the experience of local production of medicines, the efforts to develop a national platform for the diagnostics products (inputs and reagents) are quite recent.
Mohammed El SaidUniversity of Central Lancashire, UKPublic Health
Access to Medicines
MENAI study public health and access to medicines in the Arab region, including the impact of bilateral free trade and association agreements on the Arab countries. Recent work in the region shows adverse impact of such agreements on public health and access to medicines yet there is not enough research conducted.
Sean Flynn
Meredith Jacob
American University Washington College of Law, USAThe Global Network on Copyright User Rights Users' RightsGlobalA group of copyright experts assembled by PIJIP at American University to generate policy options and expert guidance on the protection of users’ rights through flexible limitations and exceptions in national copyright laws. The network has drafted a Model Flexible Copyright Exception for legislators in countries considering copyright reform, which can be adapted to most copyright laws. This framework and other papers are available at infojustice.org/flexible-use.
Seble BarakiJustice and Legal Systems Research Institute, EthiopiaUsers' RightsEthiopia
Africa
I plan to do research on the implications of WIPO's international treaty on limitations and exceptions for visually impaired persons and people with print disabilities in Ethiopia. Particularly in light of improving the current copyright legislation of Ethiopia (Copyright and Neighboring rights protection Proclamation No. 410/2004) which does not include a specific limitations for blind people and others with print disabilities. This work will be focused on providing a suggestions on how to improve our copyright legislation so as to enable this group access to information including up-to-date learning and teaching materials.
Jeremy MalcolmDepartment of Economics, American University, USA
American University Washington College of Law, USA
Consumers International, USA
Measuring the Economic Effects of Flexible Use Exceptions in Copyright LawUsers' Rights
Copyright Reform
GlobalThis is a collaboration between Consumers International and American University to develop empirical and quantitative accounts of the value of limitations and exceptions to copyright. The study will have several components, including the creation of an index of copyright flexibility -- led by Walter Park, the creator of the Park Index of Patent Rights, consumer and producer surveys, and research and research funds to promote empirical, including econometric and case study, analysis of the impacts of copyright flexibility on social and economic development goals.
Niva Elkin-KorenUniversity of Haifa, IsraelUsers' Rights
Enforcement
GlobalI am currently involved in two projects on user rights. One seeks to articulate exceptions and limitations as rights, as the rights of online users are increasingly under siege due to the shift to digital and the expansion of copyright protection. Against this background, I seek to offer a legal framework that moves beyond exceptions to copyright and articulate permissible uses as rights. Another study seeks to define the legal status of Fair Use Best Practices and to identify the practical implications.
Floriana FossatoCenter for the Study of New Media and Society, New Economic School, RussiaRanking Digital RightsUsers' Rights
Privacy and Surveillance
Russia
Europe
We are currently involved in the 'Ranking Digital Rights' project led by Rebecca MacKinnon. This is a comparative study of public and private (online service provider) Internet policies in various states (including Russia). Freedom of expression is closely intertwined with privacy across the sector and, as connectivity increases, so do the challenges. This research effort will include two main components:(1) a Landscape Assessment, focusing on analyzing the current policy environment in the country. (2) Mapping of Key Actors, including identification of key individuals and organizations working in the internet policy space and the mapping of relationship networks. Some 25 Russian IT companies and Internet organizations have agreed to participate in interviews for this research.
Greg LastowkaRutgers University, USAUsers' RightsGlobalI'm currently researching the nature of user-generated content creation on a variety of online platforms, with a particular focus on copyright infringement and fair use issues. The work includes some research into demographics of UGC creation, as well as genres, motivations, and other factors.
Jessica LitmanUniversity of Michigan, USAUsers' RightsUSAI'm writing a book on the interests of readers, listeners and viewers in the copyright system (title: "Copyright Liberties"). I am also working with a small group on an effort to come up with a model copyright law that could be useful in the domestic (US) copyright reform effort.
John BergemayerPublic Knowledge, USAUsers' RightsUSABroadly I work on the ways in which IP, competition law, and Internet policy together shape the future of access to video content, ranging from work on DRM and copyright law (e.g, the scope of the Section 106 rights) to the impact of Internet peering disputes on consumer access to media.
Centre for Internet and Society, IndiaGreater Access to Published Works by Impaired Persons and Persons with Print DisabilitiesUsers' RightsIndia
Global
Following up CIS’ intervention in support of the Treaty for the Visually Impaired, CIS is now studying the implementation of the WIPO Treaty in India and other jurisdictions.
Jinying LiOregon State University, USAPiracy Culture in ChinaBehavior and Attitudes
Piracy / Informal Circulation and Distribution
ChinaThis research will trace the development of an alternative, pirate space of underground cultural circulation that was created through China’s fast growing circuits of peer-to-peer (p2p) networks. It is based on empirical, ethnographic studies of P2P culture in China.
Miroslaw FiliciakUniversity of Social Sciences/Centrum Cyfrowe, Warsaw, PolandSecretly CulturalBehavior and Attitudes
Piracy / Informal Circulation and Distribution
Poland
Europe
Secretly Cultural is a qualitative investigation of intermediaries in informal and pirate circulations of content. We interviewed owners of large file collections on the largest Polish file locker site Chomikuj; translators of movie subtitles; and administrators of rogue online game servers, among others.
Miroslaw FiliciakUniversity of Social Sciences/Centrum Cyfrowe, Warsaw, PolandThe Social History of VCRsBehavior and Attitudes
Piracy / Informal Circulation and Distribution
Poland
Europe
This project focuses on the early days of the Polish home video market, the social networks of movie copying, but also on processes of erasing those popular practices from Poles’ memory and labeling them as barbaric and unmodern. The research is based mainly on press archives and about two dozen interviews with people involved in this market in 80s and early 90s. One goal is to show that many of the debates about copyright that take place today are very similar to those of early 90s, and that many of demonized issues - like home-copying enabled by VCRs - eventually made the producers richer, not poorer. I'd like to rehabilitate those grassroots video-sharing practices, and in the process help change wider public understanding of files sharing.
Julian Thomas
Ramon Lobato
Swindburne University, AustraliaAn Analysis of Pirate Media Markets in Relation to Theories of the Informal EconomyBehavior and Attitudes
Piracy / Informal Circulation and Distribution
GlobalOur aim is to establish an alternative framework for analyzing pirate media markets, drawing on a rubric of informality. To this end, we are building a conceptual framework that brings together social science research on informal economies with current IP debates, and explains the parallels. This is primarily a conceptual/theoretical project rather than an empirical study. We hope that the results may help to provide alternative vocabularies for discussing IP issues, beyond the deadlocked property-vs-liberty positions, while also providing a possible synthetic framework to tie together transnational case studies of IP conflict.
Miguel CaetanoCenter for the Study and Research of Sociology, ISCTE-IUL, PortugalP2P Culture: a comparative sociological analysis of sites and networks for online sharing of music, movies and ebooks in Portugal and BrazilBehavior and Attitudes
Piracy / Informal Circulation and Distribution
Portugal
Brazil
Latin America
Europe
My dissertation project concerns the analysis of the sharing of unauthorized copyrighted works in Portugal and in Brazil, with a focus on three sectors: music, books and movies.
Koleman StrumpfUniversity of Kansas, USABehavior and Attitudes
Piracy / Informal Circulation and Distribution
USAI am working on the economic impact of file sharing downloads on the movie industry. There will be separate papers on theatrical and the home video markets. The paper will utilize fine grained data on downloads and sales.
Miroslaw Filiciak
Alex Tarkowski
University of Social Sciences/Centrum Cyfrowe, Warsaw, PolandPerceptions and Attitudes Toward Copyright in PolandBehavior and Attitudes
Public Understanding of Copyright
Poland
Europe
We are working (together with Michał Danielewicz and several collaborators) on a large study of perceptions and attitudes towards copyright in Poland. We have conducted 18 focus group interviews (FGI) with selected social groups including youth, teachers, academics, librarians and photocopy shop owners. The study was later supplemented with an online survey of Internet users. The goal of our study is not just to provide a metric of the knowledge about copyright law itself, but to present attitudes and perceptions related to copyright: whom it protects and whom it should protect; attitudes towards copyright enforcement, copying, and piracy, etc. This will be the first study in Poland to look at copyright not just as law, but as a social construct and a collective imaginary.
Pedro ParanaguaDuke University, USA
Fundação Vargas, Brazil
House of Representatives, Brazil
Brazilian Patent ReformTech Innovation Systems and PatentsBrazil
Latin America
This 400-page report was published in late August 2013 by the Brazilian House of Representatives, under the coordination of Rep. Newton Lima (Workers Party). The Report supports a number of reforms embedded in pending legislation, including limiting the patent term at 20 years maximum (the current Patent Act authorizes the extension for beyond 20 years under a number of common circumstances) and clarifying what is not considered to be inventions, such as second use patents and new forms of known substances. Here we draw parallels to the Indian Patent Act as revised in 2005.
Inyoung HwangThe Korean Federation of Science and Technology Societies (KOFST), South KoreaTech Innovation Systems and PatentsSouth Korea
Switzerland
Sweden
USA
Germany
Japan
Israel
I am involved in a study of the Korean knowledge ecosystem model in the Era of Creative Economy, based on semi-structured deep interviews, focused group interviews, simulation modeling, and case studies. There will be comparative dimension exploring parallels in Switzerland, Sweden, US, Germany, Japan, and Israel.
Jeremy de BeerUniversity of Ottawa, CanadaRethinking Intellectual Property Rights for Open InnovationTech Innovation Systems and Patents
Prospects and Models of Open Innovation
CanadaFocusing on tech sector innovation and IP management in Canada, with the aim of developing appropriate IP frameworks that make Canadian innovators globally competitive.
Amy KapczynskiYale Law School, USATech Innovation Systems and Patents
Prospects and Models of Open Innovation
GlobalI'm working on an empirical qualitative project about the WHO's influenza virus sharing network, as part of a larger account of science without IP. I have several other projects in the works or under submission, including an article on the First Amendment and the regulation of off-label marketing (focusing on the scary Caronia case), and another about using regulatory "sticks" to promote innovation. The main aim is to try to move beyond IP in the legal literature, to develop a concept of "intellectual propertIES" and innovation modes beyond the market.
Andrew RensDuke University, USARe-Imagining Scientific Knowledge as a Global CommonsTech Innovation Systems and Patents
Prospects and Models of Open Innovation
GlobalThe current theoretical model of international trade that characterizes publicly funded scientific research as private goods hinders the resolution of global collective action problems such as climate change; food, energy and water security and global pandemics. I’m exploring how these problems might be better addressed by characterizing publicly-funded scientific knowledge as part of a global commons.
Centre for Internet and Society, IndiaPervasive Technologies: Access to Knowledge in the MarketplaceTech Innovation Systems and Patents
Tech patents
India
South Asia
This project explores methodologies of providing greater access to knowledge in the marketplace via sub $100 mobile devices. The project examines hardware, software and content layers in the context of the national and international legal framework that govern Indian patent law, copyright law, standards policy, and competition law.
Centre for Internet and Society, IndiaPatentability of Computer Related InventionsTech Innovation Systems and Patents
Tech patents
India
South Asia
Work on this front explores options for and consequences excluding computer-related programs from patentability. We are now working with the Government regarding the interpretation of the relevant guidelines and laws around this issue.
Centre for Internet and Society, IndiaPatent Pools for ICT Technology Development in IndiaTech Innovation Systems and Patents
Tech patents
India
South Asia
CIS India, partnering with PIJIP, is leading a project examining patent pools as a solution to liberate ICT development that is already underway in India.
Jorge ContrerasAmerican University Washington College of Law, USARegistry of Non-SDO Patent CommitmentsTech Innovation Systems and Patents
Tech patents
GlobalPIJIP has begun a registry of publicly-available statements and commitments made with respect to patents and patent licensing outside of formal standards-development organizations (SDOs). Some of these statements and commitments relate to the use of patents essential to standards, but others relate to uses in open source software and other contexts.
Rochelle DreyfussNYU, USATech Innovation Systems and Patents
Patent Offices and Functioning of the Patent System
USAI’m writing series of articles on specialized adjudication of patent disputes in the United States. I have started to look at the effect of specialization on patent law as it is applied in other countries.
Arlene ZankWay Better Patents, USATech Innovation Systems and Patents
Patent Offices and Functioning of the Patent System
USAWe have undertaken a study of the impact of accelerated examination programs for patents. Do these programs meet their stated goals, who participates in them, and what are the outcomes. We have completed the first phase of work on the impact of the USPTO Green Technology Pilot Program (Analysis of the first 835 patents). We are looking at this program in light of the new authority granted to the Director of USPTO to grant accelerated examination for "economically important" innovations. We are looking at a variety of quantitative and qualitative issues to determine who is benefitting from these efforts.
Arlene ZankWay Better Patents, USATech Innovation Systems and Patents
Patent Offices and Functioning of the Patent System
USAWe are also trying to provide weekly box scores that identify the number of patents granted, the level of co-inventorship across geographic boundaries, and core information on patents in an accessible format. Much of the metrics here focus on assigning patents to countries based on the first named inventors. This information obscures much of the real information on where inventions are coming from because no detailed analysis of the geolocation of the teams is being undertaken.
Niva Elkin-KorenUniversity of Haifa, IsraelTech Innovation Systems and Patents
University Tech Transfer
Israel
MENA
I'm currently involved in a project on technology transfer and commercialization of government-sponsored research. The project explores whether changes in the legal regime affect R&D activity (as measured by the number of patent applications), focusing on stem cell research in Israel as a case study. A related project maps the practices of patenting and commercializing governmental funded research (sponsored by the Israeli Ministry of Science).
Carolyn NcubeUniversity of Capetown, South AfricaTech Innovation Systems and Patents
University Tech Transfer
South Africa
Africa
South Africa recently enacted Bayh-Dole like legislation encouraging the commercialization of university-based research. As part of the OpenAir project, I’m working on a case study on the benefits of publicly funded research, focusing on tech transfer practices at two universities.
Arlene ZankWay Better Patents, USATech Innovation Systems and Patents
University Tech Transfer
USAI'm working on an econometric study of the rates at which patents granted to university and academic researchers/inventors are licensed—with licensing being an indicator that the inventions are being commercialized and made available to the public. Since many university patents cover basic research, we are attempting to gain insight into what is actually licensed and when in its patent lifecycle. We believe that this work will help policy makers frame the discussions on how the end products from publicly funded research transfer to the marketplace.
Jorge ContrerasAmerican University Washington College of Law, USANarratives of Gene PatentingTech Innovation Systems and Patents
Biological Patents
USA
Global
Examination of narrative strains in the debate over gene patenting in the US and worldwide.
Carolina Botero
Pedro Mizukami
Ronaldo Lemos
Others
Karisma Foundation, ColombiaCollecting Societies in Latin AmericaIncentives and Remuneration for Creative Work
Collecting Societies
Latin America
Brazil
Jamaica
Colombia
This project is part of the larger Alternative Business Models project on alternative compensation systems in Latin America (partners in Brazil, Jamaica and Colombia). It examines issues of regulation, transparency and accountability, the relationship with new social media entities that perform overlapping functions (like YouTube).
Alek TarkowskiCentrum Cyfrowe, PolandIncentives and Remuneration for Creative Work
Collecting Societies
PolandAn economic study of the financial statements of Polish collecting societies, demonstrating the flows of funding (and their inefficiencies) that shape the delivery of royalties to creators.
Michael GeistUniversity of OttawaCollective Copyright ManagementIncentives and Remuneration for Creative Work
Collecting Societies
CanadaEffectiveness and potential administrative reforms in Canada, and accountability of collective rights management organizations.
Peter DiColaNorthwestern University, USAIncentives and Remuneration for Creative Work
Licensing
USAAnother set of projects involves studying the licensing of copyrighted works for digital platforms. The empirical goal is to study what works well and what does not with private licenses. The policy goal is to learn about government policies that encourage licensing that is socially beneficial. Here, I have focused on the music industry, but not to the exclusion of video, newspapers, and books.
Elizabeth Townsend GardTulane University, USAThe Durationator' Copyright ExperimentIncentives and Remuneration for Creative Work
Licensing
GlobalThe Durationator is an experimental software tool that tries to determine the copyright status of any type of work in any jurisdiction in the world.
Christopher Sprigman
Jeanne Fromer
Christopher Buccafusco
NYU, USAExperimental Studies of Incentives in Intellectual PropertyIncentives and Remuneration for Creative Work
Incentives and Copyright
USAA series of experiments testing the differential effects of rules conditioning protection of creators’ work on the creators achieving certain thresholds of creativity. The experiments are meant to model existing copyright and patent laws, which set very different thresholds for the amount of creativity necessary to secure IP rights. A second line of experimental research looks at ‘Sequential Innovation Rules in Intellectual Property,’ and tests the differential effects of IP rules governing the right of follow-on creators to build on other’s pre-existing work.
Andrew BridgesFenwick & West LLP, USAIncentives and Remuneration for Creative Work
Incentives and Copyright
USAUS Register of Copyrights Maria Pallante said in 2012 that copyright was for authors first and the nation second. More recently she has retreated from that statement by modifying it: now she says that copyright is for authors, and what is good for authors is good for the nation. Is copyright really for all authors? In reality, it pits authors against two different groups: other authors, and the public. I plan to examine the proposition that copyright law itself does not have a single constituency. I would also like to study the effects of copyright law in pitting author (incumbent) against author (the new author who may want exploit or adapt earlier works, but who faces restrictions on doing so and penalties for violating those restrictions). Also, given that copyright terms extend for the life of the author plus seventy years, during the majority of most copyright terms the "author" who benefits from copyright law is dead. Does copyright law therefore favor dead authors against new authors? Who benefits from such a principle?
Kristin ThomsonNorthwestern University, USAArtist Revenue ProjectIncentives and Remuneration for Creative Work
Remuneration
USAThis project involves surveying musicians in the U.S. about their sources of revenue. The survey was in the field in 2011 and the project team hopes to replicate the survey in 2014, pending funding. The goal is to eventually study changes in the different "revenue streams" of musicians. The hope is that this will shed light on economic theories of copyright and incentives for creation.
Evelin HeidelFundacion Via Libre, ArgentinaIncentives and Remuneration for Creative Work
Remuneration
Argentina
Latin America
We are planning to explore authors and artists’ perceptions of copyright, based on a basic set of questions: Do they know how the law works? Do they understand the copyright system? Do they benefit from it? If so, how? If they don't benefit from it, what other tools do they use in order to make a living from their art? The hypothesis is that most authors and artists don't understand the copyright system and don't make a living out of it, and that this lack of knowledge the complexity behind it causes a lot of problems for other institutions, like libraries.
Miguel CaetanoCenter for the Study and Research of Sociology, ISCTE-IUL, PortugalUsers and distributors. Networked Communication and European Cinema in P2P NetworksIncentives and Remuneration for Creative Work
Creative Industries
GlobalThis is a collaborative project at our center made up of three parts: (1) an assessment of the state of the European film industry in the context of the global movie business and the importance of Hollywood, from development to financing, production, distribution, and exhibition/consumption; (2) Analysis of the effects and impacts of digitization on the European film industry again from the same chain value perspective; (3) results of a survey of online consumption habits among Portuguese Internet users. With this report, we hope to open up policy and media discussions of access to culture and knowledge in Portugal.
Rahul Telang
Mike Smith
Carnegie Mellon University, USAIncentives and Remuneration for Creative Work
Creative Industries
USAMost of our work in this area is about understanding how piracy and anti-piracy measures affect user and firm incentives. The methods are mostly economics and impact is to bring data analysis to the table.
Joel WaldfogelUniversity of Minnesota, USAIncentives and Remuneration for Creative Work
Creative Industries
USAOne big project is quantifying the supply of new creative products since digitization. Earlier work by me and others documented harmful effects of piracy on revenue. But this big question is whether, in light of both the bad news on the demand side (piracy) and good news on the supply side (a reduction of bringing new products to market), consumers continue to experience a robust flow of new products. I have written a series of papers examining this question with data on music. I am now looking at books.
Joel WaldfogelUniversity of Minnesota, USAIncentives and Remuneration for Creative Work
Creative Industries
USAA second large project is concerned with digitization and international trade in music. Now that products are digital - and product discovery channels are broad - does distance continue to matter in international trade? Does the US dominate global markets in music in the same way that it does in movies? Does the move toward more frictionless trade help or hurt consumers and producers in a variety of different markets? The study will examine North America and Europe.
Jessica SilbeySuffolk University Law School, UKIncentives and Remuneration for Creative Work
Creative Industries
United KingdomI am writing a book on intellectual property's various roles in artistic and scientific work based on a series of in-depth interviews with artists and scientists and business lawyer and business managers. The work is based on qualitative empirical methods and will be published by Stanford University Press. I have conducted 50 interviews with people on the east-coast of the United States in a wide-variety of industry/fields. My hope is that the research will undercut the one-dimensional explanation for IP protection in the US and provide additional evidence for IP law's retarding and extraneous effects/uses in industries that are nonetheless IP-rich.
Ana SantosDuke Law School, USAIncentives and Remuneration for Creative Work
Creative Industries
AfricaI am researching the impact of IP on creative industries in developing countries. My current main focus is sub-Saharan Africa, and I have been studying the music industry in selected African countries. I have field work planned in Senegal and Ghana later on this year. I am also planning to look at other creative industries (especially the film industry) and to connect patterns of IP and developmental policies in selected countries to existing economic literature on creative clustering.
Centre for Internet and Society, IndiaThe Legal Music Market in India in Response to the Digital AgeIncentives and Remuneration for Creative Work
Creative Industries
IndiaOngoing CIS work in this area (most recently by Amba Uttara) argues that litigation and technological solutions such as Digital Rights Management are no solution for the “pricing problem” of the Indian music market and that as new players, such as telecom operators and content aggregators, emerge in the music ecosystem, legal music services must move away from the perceived crisis within old business structures.
Nagla RizkAmerican University, EgyptIndependent Musicians in EgyptIncentives and Remuneration for Creative Work
Alternative Business Models
AfricaPart of ‘A2K4D,’ the North Africa Hub of the Open African Innovation Research Project (Open AIR). The research is intended to help develop hybrid business models for production and delivery of creative content, and alternative ways of dealing with IP in ways that empower authors and expand access to users.
Volker GrassmuckCentre for Digital Culture (CDC), Leuphana University GermanyWikiVision.euIncentives and Remuneration for Creative Work
Alternative Business Models
GlobalThis project starts from (1) the perception of the video revolution that brings forth numerous works that deserve a seal of quality on a par with the productions of the public service media, and (2) the enduring astonishment that the Wikipedia is possible, i.e. that out of the cooperation of free and equal peers an encyclopedia, one of the most import knowledge infrastructures of our times can emerge. Adding one and two together leads to the obvious, yet megalomaniac question whether we could not in the same manner create a high-quality audio-visual self-observation of society.
Volker Grassmuck
Rolf Grossman
Bodo Balazs
Pablo Ortellado
Leuphana University, Germany
IViR, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands
GPOPAI, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil
German Green Party
Sharing Licence Pilot ProjectIncentives and Remuneration for Creative Work
Alternative Business Models
EuropeWe are currently working on Alternative Compensation Schemes to legalize and monetize currently infringing online practices. Though in the last decade there have been many proposals, most of these were done by legal scholars following a top-down approach, ie: if this is legally possible and fair, this (or something similar) should be implemented. We also start with mapping the legally possible alternatives (mostly within the European context), but then we translate the legal alternatives into simple survey items and conduct a representative surveys to see which enjoy the highest level of support (measured in willingness to pay). The outcome of the survey will undergo an economic analysis to establish the welfare effects of different scenarios.
Michael GeistUniversity of Ottawa, CanadaCopyright ReformCanadaCanada recently concluded more than ten years of contentious debate over copyright reform. I have been researching the evolution of the policy process and the impact of the public, technology, and foreign pressures on domestic reforms; (6) The IP implications from trade negotiations - particularly CETA and TPP.
Centre for Internet and Society, IndiaReform of Copyright Laws in IndiaCopyright ReformIndiaWe have been examining Indian Copyright Law (including legislations, rules, cases, guidelines etc.) and plan to produce a working paper on the current position of Indian Copyright Law and the changes that we would like to see incorporated within it.
Brandon ButlerAmerican University Washington College of Law, USAThe Strange Case of Pre-1972 Sound RecordingsCopyright ReformUSAThese are protected not by federal copyright law, but by a patchwork of state anti-piracy laws and common law copyright. Many interesting questions follow from this legal oddity. What are the economic consequences of this hybrid regime? Have rights holders suffered from the lack of access to statutory damages, DMCA anti-circumvention protection, etc. etc.?
Pedro ParanaguaDuke University, USA
Fundação Vargas, Brazil
House of Representatives, Brazil
Brazilian Copyright ReformCopyright ReformBrazilMy dissertation involves comparative study of draft versions of the copyright reform bill as it passed through the Brazilian Congress, with a focus on users' rights, and re-legitimizing and re-balancing the Brazilian copyright regime. The work hopes to influence not only the Brazilian legislative process (a translation into Portuguese will be needed), taking advantage of the fact that the author is advisor to the ruling party at the Brazilian House of Representatives, but also to influence other countries that are studying the possibility of reforming copyright law.
Barton BeebeNYU, USASubstantial Similarity Tests for CopyrightCopyright ReformUSAI’m currently conducting (with co-authors) an empirical study of ‘substantial similarity’ tests developed through copyright case law as a means of evaluating whether a reproduction of a copyrighted work is infringing. This is a case-counting project, involving the systematic content analysis of all relevant reported federal court opinions.
Corynne McSherryElectronic Frontier Foundation, USACopyright ReformUSAOn the copyright reform front, we’re focusing on statutory damages, first sale (esp digital), and reform of DMCA section 1201. For each of these, EFF's goal is to find ways to restore the balance between copyright and the public interest, so that copyright can better serve the goal of promoting the progress of science and the useful arts. Outside of copyright, we are working to collect data on patent trolls and prior art for certain specific patented inventions, in order to fight back against patent abuse.
Rebecca Giblin
Kimberlee Weatherall
Monash University, Australia
University of Sydney, Australia
Copyright Law in the Public InterestCopyright ReformGlobalA project led by Rebecca Giblin looking at what global copyright law would look like if formulated in the public interest. A workshop is planned for 2014 (involving a small number of academics in the area) with a view to producing a book in mid-2015 with chapters on different issues in copyright law. Akin to Samuelson's Copyright Principles Project but from an angle more akin to Jessica Litman's old thought experiment, which asked: 'if your client were the public, and copyright law were a contract, would you advise your client to sign it?
Carolina BoteroKarisma Foundation, ColombiaPublic Investment in Text Books in the South of Latin America.’ Carolina Botero, Karisma FoundationAccess to Knowledge and Cultural Goods
Access to Educational Materials
Latin AmericaA five-country comparative study in Latin America that seeks to describe and compare procurement practices for educational materials K-12 public education systems. Funder: UNESCO. This work will expand in 2014 to include more countries and higher education.
Joe Karaganis
Lawrence Liang
Pedro Mizukami
Eve Grey
Miroslaw Filiciak
Pablo Arrieta
Evelin Heidel
Alek Tarkowski
The Ecology of Access to Educational Materials in UniversitiesAccess to Knowledge and Cultural Goods
Access to Educational Materials
Brazil
India
South Africa
Poland
Argentina
Colombia
USA
A large 7-country comparative study of how students and faculty get the materials they need for their work, focusing on Brazil, India, South Africa, Poland, Argentina, Colombia, and the US. Our ‘ecological’ approach links ‘bottom-up’ accounts of student and classroom activity with institutional strategies and public policy on access and educational limitations and exceptions.
Joe KaraganisThe American Assembly, Columbia University, USAOER Demand IndicatorsAccess to Knowledge and Cultural Goods
Access to Educational Materials
USA
Global
Building on the new Open Syllabus Project, I think we’ll be able to provide demand indicators for open access materials in the US and in other countries where we can secure university-level participation. We will be looking for partners able to broker access to university syllabus repositories. Currently Sloan Foundation funded.
Andrew RensDuke University, USAThe Provision of Educational Resources as Public GoodsAccess to Knowledge and Cultural Goods
Access to Educational Materials
USAI examine the provision of 'learning materials' reconceived as educational resources at primary, secondary and tertiary level and by state, intergovernmental and non-profit private agencies and suggest that mandating public licenses such as Creative Commons Attribution can best achieve the objectives of these agencies. The hoped for impact is to provide the advocates of Open Educational Resources with developed arguments for conversation with policy-makers.
Brandon ButlerAmerican University Washington College of Law, USALicensing and fair use issues for librariesAccess to Knowledge and Cultural Goods
Libraries
USAI'll be following up libraries who have used the ARL 'Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Academic and Research Libraries' to see whether the Code has, in practice, reduced uncertainty and promoted best practices around fair use. I also plan to explore whether the licensing costs associated with use of older academic journal content suppress the market for newer content, such as monographs. Finally, I may look at the types of works held by libraries that are technically covered by copyright but are clearly not produced with any hope of remuneration via licensing, etc. How has copyright changed the fate of those works, made them less available as subjects for scholarship, lay enjoyment, etc.?
J. Carlos LaraDerechos Digitales, ChileAccess to Knowledge and Cultural Goods
Libraries
Chile
Latin America
I've been conducting research in support of an effort to provide one of Santiago's biggest universities with an open access repository. Currently in its advanced stages, the goal is to implement an institutional repository for faculty works (whose rights are legally held by the university) and graduate and undergraduate thesis.
Laura CzerneiwiczUniversity of Capetown, South AfricaAcademics' Publishing Patterns and the Economics of the Most-Published in JournalsAccess to Knowledge and Cultural Goods
Libraries
GlobalA case study of the most often-published in journals and the associated costs and legal requirements. The project is intended to surface the hidden costs and legal requirements of both traditional and open access publishing (including the tendency towards double dipping).
Peter Jaszi
Pam Samuelson
American University Washington College of Law, USA
University of California, Berkeley, USA
Best Practices Guidelines for Libraries and ArchivesAccess to Knowledge and Cultural Goods
Libraries
USAThe Berkeley Digital Library Copyright Project with PIJIP at American University is working to develop best practices guidelines for libraries and archives for making decisions about whether works in copyright are orphan works and whether they can be made available to the public. The project is based on a series of workshops featuring representatives of these heritage groups talking about their policies and practices and an assessment of the legal environment. We believe that many uses of orphan works can be justified as fair use. The best practices guidelines could be very valuable to heritage institutions to facilitate greater access to orphan works.
Peter Jaszi
Pam Samuelson
American University Washington College of Law, USA
University of California, Berkeley, USA
Policy and Judicial Interventions around Fair UseAccess to Knowledge and Cultural Goods
Libraries
USAThe Berkeley group participates in the ongoing policy and judicial conversations around fair use and other key components of copyright law in the digital era. This work includes submitting comments and reply comments to the Copyright Office in response to its Notice of Inquiry about orphan works and mass digitization, and filing amicus curiae briefs on behalf of academic authors in three pending copyright cases: Authors Guild v Google, arguing both against class certification and that digitizing texts to enable text mining is fair use; Authors Guild v HathiTrust, arguing against the Guild having standing to challenge HT except as to copyrights it owns and making the same argument regarding fair use for text mining; and Cambridge U Press v Becker, arguing that Georgia State's practice of allowing limited uploading of portions of copyrighted works was fair use.
Agata KrolikowskiUniversity of Humboldt, GermanyOrphan Works in Digital LibrariesAccess to Knowledge and Cultural Goods
Libraries
Germany
Europe
The ongoing German and European regulations on orphan works are the focus of this project, conducted in cooperation with a working group at Humboldt University Institute for Internet and Society.
Lawrence LiangAlternative Law Forum, IndiaArchives, Access, AnxietiesAccess to Knowledge and Cultural Goods
Libraries
GlobalWhile librarians have been at the forefront of copyright reform, archivists seem to have entered the debate relatively late. Because the traditional function of archives emphasized preservation, they were not bothered much by copyright restrictions. But as archives go digital, the line between preservation and dissemination begins to blur and we see many more archivists entering the IP debate. We are helping a number of new online archives which have emerged to create public domain materials to navigate the copyright system.
Sean Flynn
Mike Palmedo
American University Washington College of Law, USAThe IP Enforcement NetworkEnforcementGlobalA loose network of 450+ academics and advocates run by PIJIP at American University. The Network mobilizes public-interest interventions in international intellectual property policy debates, from ACTA to TPP and TTIP.
Pedro Mizukami
Pablo Otellado
Fundação Vargas, Brazil
University of Sao Paulo, Brazil
Balanced Enforcement at the CNCPEnforcementBrazilPrior research and advocacy efforts in Brazil led to the appointment of CTS-FGV and the University of São Paulo's GPOPAI to Brazilian National Antipiracy Council (CNCP)—the first non-industry members. Both institutions are trying to push for a more balanced research agenda within the council. GPOPAI is working on a consumer survey, and FGV is trying to reinvent "The CNCP Monograph Contest” as a vehicle for promoting serious research.
Joe Karaganis
Jennifer Urban
The American Assembly, Columbia University, USA
University of California, Berkeley, USA
Robo-Notice and TakedownEnforcementUSAAn empirical study that examines the integrity of the notice and takedown process as the process is automated by senders and targets.
Rosana Pinheiro MachadoUniversity of Oxford, UKEnforcement in Brazil and ChinaEnforcementBrazil
China
In the official discourse of both countries, innovation requires strong enforcement against all kind of copies. But Brazil and China have followed sharply different paths regarding the presence of state in the control. This work compares anti-piracy efforts in Brazil and China, with the aim of understanding the ideologies and historical developments that produced these policies.
Rebecca GiblinMonash University, AustraliaEvaluation of the Global Graduated ResponseEnforcementAustraliaRecently completed project examining each jurisdiction in which graduated response is currently operational, or on its way to adoption, including evaluation of the evidence to determine the extent to which such laws help achieve copyright law's underlying aims.
Natasha TusikovAustralian National UniversityPrivate Trademark Enforcement PracticesEnforcementGlobalMy dissertation examines how trademark owners are working with Internet intermediaries to remove infringing content (for marketplaces and trading platforms) and withdraw critical services (for infringing sites). These voluntary enforcement programs constitute global, extra-legal, private enforcement that in many cases is carried out secretly by intermediaries based on allegations, not proof of infringement, by rights holders. As there is little research, particularly in the scholarly realm, on private, online anti-counterfeiting efforts, my research will give an idea of how rights holders, state actors and intermediaries are working together in that area and some of the divergent and convergent interests shaping their involvement. More broadly, my research will demonstrate how state and private interests are converging in relation to private, voluntary regulation on the Internet.
Niva Elkin-KorenUniversity of Haifa, IsraelChanges in Intermediary EnforcementEnforcementIsraelI am currently working on two projects on copyright enforcement by online intermediaries. One seeks to map actual copyright enforcement practices in the shadow of the law (in Israel). The study looks settlements, legal warnings, cease & desist, Public Relations, OSPs' “voluntary” technological measures (i.e. filtering, blocking, removing), and Notice and Take-down actual practices. I am also involved in more theoretical study of the changing nature of online intermediaries, and the new convergence of control over content, access and end-users.
Alex DentGeorge Washington University, USAEnforcementGlobalMy work focuses on two general questions: (1) What are the "costs" of IP policing, where costs are conceived of not only in financial terms, but also in social and cultural terms? Put somewhat differently, what does it mean that the vast majority of the world`s population experiences IP as an interdiction? (2) What is the relationship between policy-making in DC and global policing practice? How does one translate into the other, and then back into policy once more? Specifically, I've been looking at the ways in which the Brazilian police integrate what they are doing with long-standing cultural discourses about objects and ideas, as well as their relationship with international NGOs. Despite the relative uniformity of international IP policies, I've found that its implementation needs to be looked at on a local basis. All my research is ethnographic and historical.
Alberto CerdaUniversity of Chile Law School, ChileEnforcementLatin America
Argentina
Brazil
Colombia
Chile
Costa Rica
Mexico
Peru
I am working on a doctoral dissertation that focuses on human rights challenges for Latin American countries facing copyright enforcement. I examine a few Latin American countries: Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Chile, Costa Rica, Mexico, and Peru. And I pay close attention to criminal enforcement and measures for enforcing copyright online. While most scholarship has focused on free speech and access to knowledge, I try to broaden the discussion by providing a comparative law analysis that focuses on other fundamental rights granted by both international instruments on human rights and domestic constitutions.
Kimberlee WeatherallUniversity of Sydney, AustraliaFair and Equitable EnforcementEnforcementGlobalWhat, if anything, is the content of the obligation to ensure that enforcement procedures are 'fair and equitable' (TRIPS 41.2; ACTA article 6; EU IP Enforcement Directive, Article 1). Having observed that trade negotiators argue that all the detailed enforcement provisions that we see in recent treaties are balanced by the inclusion of such general articles, the chapter will test the extent to which such obligation might have 'teeth'.
Lawrence LiangAlternative Law Forum, IndiaPrivate Enforcement Between Policing and Law Firms’EnforcementIndia
South Asia
In the last few years we have seen the mushrooming of enforcement agencies in india who are a strange breed since they are essentially private entities (enforcement companies, detective companies, law firms). Most of these are headed by former members of the police and hence have an inside knowledge of how the criminal justice system especially at the level of everyday policing function works and they also have the ability to obtain the cooperation of the local police. While these enforcement agencies were active for a while in the space of commercial piracy, we see them shifting gradually to the online enforcement space, and we are interested in tracking the shift as a continuation of earlier ethnographic work that we have done on enforcement.
Kimberlee WeatherallUniversity of Sydney, AustraliaTesting Trade Mark Law's Image of the ConsumerTrademarkAustraliaProject involves working with cognitive psychologists on finding useful ways to test confusion in trade mark law - ie empirical ways to test the 'rules of thumb' courts seem to adopt in most cases regarding what trademarks will lead to confusion. This is a three year project involving work with Trade Marks Office and Federal Court of Australia.
Inyoung HwangThe Korean Federation of Science and Technology Societies (KOFST), South KoreaLaw and Policy of Online Privacy in Korea: Current Regulation and Reform AgendaPrivacy and SurveillanceGlobalOur goal is to review the current regulatory system thoroughly and systematically, and to identify problem areas and propose reform. The project involves research cooperation among a group of academics and practicing lawyers, and will include case studies of the US and EU.
Information Society Project, Yale Law School, USA
A2K4D, American University, Egypt
Center for Technology and Society, Brazil
Global Censorship and Access to KnowledgePrivacy and SurveillanceGlobalA collaborative book project.
Nagla RizkAmerican University, EgyptGlobal Censorship and Access to KnowledgePrivacy and SurveillanceEgypt
MENA
Africa
Writing a chapter in 'Global Censorship and Access to Knowledge' on the economic losses to the internet shutdown in Egypt in 2011, focusing on the asymmetry in handling political and economic liberties in the Middle East and showing the economic losses as collateral damage to censoring freedom of expression.
Seble BarakiJustice and Legal Systems Research institute, EthiopiaCapacity BuildingEthiopia
Africa
As one can imagine Ethiopia (one of the World's LDC), is among the countries where IP is totally ignored. This is despite some efforts undertaken by Ethiopian Intellectual Property Office. I work in a research institute that is capable of influencing government policy. I have recommended that the Institute take up work focused on building a balanced IP system in Ethiopia. In addition to research, this would involve creating an Ethiopian IP Professionals association, which would work to increase the importance/contribution of IP in Ethiopia and also allow IP professionals in Ethiopia to contribute in the development process of the Country. Second, we are trying to organizing a National Conference on Copyright.
Esther NgomOpen Air Project, AfricaGeographical IndicatorsAfricaI am working especially on Collective Agricultural Branding Strategies, mainly Geographical Indications (GIs) and Collective and Certification Trademarks for agricultural products. The specific question is how their use can help the local farmers in the member states of the African Intellectual Property Organization (OAPI) increase their incomes from specific agricultural products.
Tesh DagneThompson Rivers University, CanadaTraditional KnowledgeGlobalIn general, my goal for the next several years is to prepare articles and conduct research on the protection of traditional knowledge and biodiversity in reference to works in this area under the frameworks of WIPO, the CBD and FAO. My current work specifically looks at the feasibility of IP-based models for protecting traditional knowledge-related agricultural products such as Indian Basmati rice, Ethiopian coffee, Ghanaian cocoa, South African Rooibos tea,..etc. I will soon start a research project under the theme of "Implementing the Nagoya Protocol using the framework of food sovereignty” and am also planning work on the WIPO’s draft articles on the protection of Traditional Knowledge. As research method, I will adopt doctrinal legal analysis of the legal and policy issues in the area.
Pedro MizukamiFundação Vargas, BrazilMapping Digital Media: BrazilAdjacent IssuesBrazilMapping Digital Media is an OSF series of comparative studies on "the global opportunities and risks created by the transition from traditional to digital media [and] how these changes affect the core democratic service that any media system should provide: news about political, economic, and social affairs."
Vikrant Narayan VasudevaIndian Law InstituteAdjacent IssuesIndia
USA
Germany
Japan
I’m working on intellectual property management in context of open source software, and the possibility of harmoniously adapting the open source model with the proprietary model for a sui generis software protection model. The approach is a comparative analysis of the jurisdictions of U.S., Germany, Japan and India.
Talha SyedUniversity of California, Berkeley, USAAdjacent Issues
Copyright Reform
GlobalMy work touches on four areas: (1) Economic analysis of how factoring in differentiated competition dynamics affects the economic theory and policy of copyright law. (2) Examining when precisely "democratic" and "distributive" theories or values result in significant differences from economic analysis for copyright law and policy. (3) Exploring how non-economic normative considerations related to non-IP-based approaches to innovation policy. (4) Copyright and Inequality: exploring the interaction between copyright rules and online expressive activity in light of three values (a) economic equity, (b) political democracy and (c) social or community ties marked less by status hierarchy and more reciprocity and mutuality recognition.
Nagla RizkAmerican University, EgyptNetworked Public Sphere and Civic Engagement in the Arab WorldAdjacent IssuesMENA
Egypt
Tunisia
A study of the use of online and offline networks to spur public action and the transition to democracy in Egypt, Tunisia
Michael GeistUniversity of Ottawa, CanadaNational digital strategies: CanadaAdjacent IssuesCanadaAnalysis of national digital strategies and development of metrics to determine their effectiveness; (4) Telecom and Internet access issues. I have several projects at early stages including analysis of the competitiveness environment for telecom in Canada and net neutrality enforcement.
Floriana FossatoCenter for the Study of New Media and Society, New Economic School, RussiaSocial networks, Peer Effect, and Protest ParticipationAdjacent IssuesRussiaThis project looks at whether the structure of online social networks affects political protests. In particular, we investigate whether the protests across Russia in 2011-2012 were less likely to occur in cities with higher fractionalization of users across different social network services. We also aim to analyze the impact of network cohesion around protest communities on the extent of protest activity. In addition, using a list experiment in a survey of Russian protest participants, we investigate whether social pressure from offline and online networks affect protest participation. Finally, we relate participation in protests across Russia in 2011-2012 with higher stocks of social capital and civic culture. We are also pursuing a number of related questions about the relationship between online social networks and political activity in Russia and in wider comparative context.
Floriana FossatoCenter for the Study of New Media and Society, New Economic School, RussiaMedia Freedom and Online-Offline Dissimilarity IndicesAdjacent IssuesGlobalThe goal of this project is to construct an index that measures the difference in coverage of politics between offline media and blogs. In particular, we collect data on the frequency of mentions of different politicians in blogs, offline media, and online media in native languages of 40+ countries in the world. Using data from Bing, Google News/Blogs/Trends, Factiva, LexisNexis, and Wikipedia, we aim to construct indices for the differential coverage of politicians in different countries in the world. We also plan to look how well it predicts the quality of governance in different countries, as compared with existing media freedom indices and other explanatory variables, and whether this difference depends on global information environment.
J. Carlos LaraDerechos Digitales, ChileAdjacent IssuesGlobalResearch on cybercrime and crime through digital means, with a comprehensive final work that includes surveys and academic papers by people outside the organisation. The goal is to provide and publish a study hitherto inexistent.
Michel Bauwens
Nicolas Mendoza
Jose M. Ramos
Thomas Leif Olsen
Digial DemocracyAdjacent IssuesGlobalThe project will reconstruct the history of techniques for democratic deliberation and decision-making and comprehensively map the online tools currently in use. It will research various implementations of the liquid democracy concept, conduct a survey on attitudes and model a reference parliament.
Centre for Internet and Society, IndiaRelicensing of the Konkani EncyclopediaAdjacent IssuesIndia
South Asia
The CIS has successfully brought “Konkani Vishwakosh,” a major encyclopedia in Goa’s mother tongue, under a Creative Commons license. The entire set will be digitized on Wikipedia. CIS then aims to build up the Konkani Wikipedia by turning students into producers of knowledge.
Jason SchultzNew York University, USATech Patents
Copyright Reform
Users' Rights
USACopyright and Patent Exhaustion (First Sale); Fair Use; Digital Libraries and digital lending; Defensive Patenting; Crowd-sourcing prior art searching
Jeremy de Beer
Tobias Schonwetter
Nagla Rizk
Carolyn Ncube
Many Others
University of Ottawa
University of Cape Town
Open AIRCopyright Reform
Traditional Knowledge
Tech Innovation Systems and Patents
AfricaThe Open AIR project is right now building toward its finale -- the book capturing current realities, the scenarios for the future, and outreach and engagement activities -- which will be marked by the December conference(s) in Cape Town. A 6-month wind-down and transition phase will follow, with all activities complete by mid-2014.
Antonio Martinez VelazquezArticulo 19Intermediaries and Codes of ConductIntermediaries
Adjacent Issues
Privacy and Surveillance
Mexico
Latin America
We are working to create predictable codes of conduct that allow for the coexistence of third party rights and freedom of expression on the Internet. The code of conduct is intended, in part, to provide ways of resolving conflicts without subjecting internet intermediaries to coercive state regulations.

One aspect of this work is a case by case study of the central conflicts intermediaries are facing. In our investigations we will whether and when self-regulation through the adoption of “best practices” provides a viable way through these conflicts.

Out broader findings will shed light on the dilemmas all social media will be facing, including “content blocking, take-down and disclosure of user identity." In so doing, we'll be asking a wide range of questions:

Are internet intermediaries promoting or censoring freedom of expression? What are the kinds of information that attract restrictions? What are the existing “standards of play”, or lack of? (Internal codes of practice vs. external codes of practice). When are intermediaries subject to external pressure to disclose information or to take down certain content? ¿How do they respond? Do these codes of conduct, terms of service, and past decisions comply with international standards?

We will also study the relationship that social media has with national laws, and these place different responsibilities on users and on intermediaries. For example, in certain countries the legal practice will directly place responsibility on the individual using an internet service, and will discard acting against intermediaries, while in other countries judicial courts may take direct actions against internet intermediaries. This will allow us to understand what kinds of pressure intermediaries receive and what actions can be taken to comply with national laws. If laws inhibit freedom of expression, what are the consequences of non compliance? How have intermediaries acted in the past faced with such dilemmas, and what are the consequences on freedom of expression.

 

 

 

 

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